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Monica Lewinsky's on Twitter: '#HereWeGo'


David M. Benett/Getty Images for Marie Curie(NEW YORK) -- In May, Monica Lewinsky vowed to speak out in order "to stick my head above the parapet so that I can take back my narrative and give a purpose to my past."

Now she seems to be doing just that -- on Twitter.

Just months after Lewinsky’s personal revelations were made public in a Vanity Fair interview, she sent her first tweet Monday morning:

#HereWeGo

— Monica Lewinsky (@MonicaLewinsky) October 20, 2014

About an hour later, Lewinsky, who describes herself in her Twitter profile as a "social activist. public speaker. contributor to vanity fair. knitter of things without sleeves," tweeted again:

excited (and nervous) to speak to #Under30Summit

— Monica Lewinsky (@MonicaLewinsky) October 20, 2014

According to Forbes' "Under 30 Summit" event agenda, Lewinsky is slated to speak about the "scourge of harassment in the digital age" later Monday morning.

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Cardinal Timothy Dolan: 'This Synod Was Not to Make Any Decisions'


Photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Archbishop of New York Cardinal Timothy Dolan said on Sunday that the new report regarding family life out from the Catholic Church this weekend does not signify a monumental change in doctrine or teaching.

The much-debated document, which included language regarding the church's stance towards gays and lesbians as well as divorced Catholics, was the final work product of a historic meeting -- or synod--— of bishops this month, which Dolan said is intended to set the agenda for further discussions this year and a second synod next fall.

"This synod was not to make any decisions," Dolan told This Week anchor George Stephanopoulos. "We weren't supposed to give any propositions. This was to set the table for a year from now."

The meeting of bishops made headlines this week after a preliminary version of their report included unprecedented, inclusive language towards towards gays and lesbians. The earlier draft read, "homosexuals have gifts and qualities to offer the Christian community."

However, the later version released Saturday stripped that language, and instead included a watered-down version, which read, "men and women with homosexual tendencies must be welcomed with respect and delicacy."

Even this more tempered paragraph did not receive a two-thirds majority vote from the bishops required for approval. In a show of transparency, the Vatican released all sections of the final document with corresponding vote counts.

At the start of the meeting, Pope Francis encouraged all bishops to speak openly, and, according to Dolan, "There was pretty good, vivid conversation, especially with the African bishops."

"There was a good debate. There was a good conversation that went on," he said.

On these hot-button issues Dolan argued that Francis is walking the "middle of the road" and is inspirational.

"Pope Francis never ceases to surprise us," he said. "And so just when you think you might have him figured out, he offers another fresh innovative way of looking."

"Keep in mind that the church's major goal is not to change teaching…but for us to change, to conform ourselves to what God has told us," the cardinal said.

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Obama on the Trail: Delivers Stump Speeches in Maryland, Illinois


Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) -- President Obama made his first public campaign appearances of 2014 Sunday night, appearing at rallies with Maryland gubernatorial candidate Anthony Brown and Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn, where he made impassioned pitches for his economic policies, reprised his 2008 campaign theme of “hope,” and grew animated at times.

“You know who they’re for, and it ain’t you,” Obama said of Republicans, at his Maryland appearance.

“It’s two different visions of America, and it comes down to a simple question: who’s going to fight for your future?” Obama said in Illinois, suggesting GOP politicians “belong in a Mad Men episode.”

Counting various references in both speeches, the president touted more Americans with health care, smaller increases in health-care costs, reduced dependence on foreign oil, a rebounded auto industry, improved reading and math scores, higher graduation rates, less crime and a smaller prison population.

In both speeches, he cited same-sex marriage as a sign of progress and blasted GOP opposition to gender-fair-pay legislation.

The White House has not mentioned any more scheduled campaign stops for the president between now and Election Day. These were two relatively easy states for him to visit: The last time Gallup rated Obama’s state-by-state approval, Maryland ranked third at 57 percent approval, behind only D.C. and Hawaii. His home state of Illinois ranked 12th at 53.7 percent.

The president was briefly heckled in the Maryland appearance by an immigration protestor, who was shouted down by “Obama” chants.

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White House’s Ebola Liaison Arrives in Dallas


iStock/Thinkstock(DALLAS) — The White House has quietly dispatched Adrian Saenz, deputy director of intergovernmental affairs, to be the administration’s eyes and ears on the ground in Dallas, coordinating Ebola efforts with state and local officials.

A Texas native, Saenz arrived in Dallas late Sunday, a senior administration official told ABC News. He will work closely with the Texas state coordinator Gov. Rick Perry appointed Friday and FEMA coordinator Kevin Hannes, who was dispatched Saturday.

Saenz was named to the role on Friday and will report directly to newly-named Ebola “czar” Ron Klain, who doesn’t officially start his new role until later this week.

An administration official said the appointment of Saenz is meant to ensure the government “is able to leverage effective coordination between the federal, state, and local levels in Dallas -- as well as with frontline healthcare workers.”

Saenz will work in close coordination with senior White House officials, including Klain, and ensure that “state and local authorities are able to call upon any and all necessary federal resources,” the official said.

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Top Health Official Defends Choice for Ebola Czar


iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, defended President Obama's choice of Ron Klain to be the administration's Ebola "czar" despite his lack of medical background, calling him an "excellent manager."

"I think that's a misplaced criticism," Fauci told ABC's This Week anchor George Stephanopoulos on Sunday. "What we're talking about now is an Ebola response coordinator, somebody who has extraordinary, as he does, managerial experience...leadership experience, which he has plenty of."

"He's going to rely on medical experts, like myself and Dr. Frieden and others, to do the medical things," Fauci said, referring to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention chief Dr. Tom Frieden.

Meanwhile, Fauci also defended the administration's decision to not ban travel from those countries in West Africa that have been hardest hit by Ebola.

"When people come in from a country it's much easier to track them if you know where they're coming from," Fauci said. "But what you do if you then completely ban travel, there's the feasibility of going to other countries where we don't have a travel ban and have people come in."

As for the situation at home, Fauci maintained that the new CDC protocols for the proper treatment of Ebola patients "will be finalized soon," admitting that certain aspects of the current guidelines fell short in critical ways.

Fauci also gave an update on the condition of Nina Pham, one of the nurses who contracted Ebola after caring for Thomas Eric Duncan, saying her condition is "fair" and "stable," and she is in "very good spirits."

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Romney Leads Scattered 2016 GOP Field, Clinton Still Dominates the Democratic Race


iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Hillary Clinton continues to hold a commanding lead in the potential Democratic field for president in 2016, while the GOP frontrunner in the latest ABC News/Washington Post poll is a familiar figure – but one not favored by eight in 10 potential Republican voters.

That would be Mitt Romney, supported for the GOP nomination by 21 percent of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents. That's double the support of his closest potential rival, but it also leaves 79 percent who prefer one of 13 other possible candidates tested, or none of them.

See PDF with full results and tables here.

When Romney is excluded from the race, his supporters scatter, adding no clarity to the GOP free-for-all. In that scenario former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee and Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul have 12 or 13 percent support from leaned Republicans who are registered to vote. All others have support in the single digits.

Were Romney to run again, he'd likely face some of the same challenges that dragged out the 2012 GOP contest. He's supported by only half as many "strong" conservatives as those who are "somewhat" conservative, 15 vs. 30 percent in this poll, produced for ABC by Langer Research Associates.

Huckabee, for his part, does somewhat better with Republican-leaning independents than with mainline Republicans, a potential problem in closed primaries. He also does better with women than with men; that’s reversed for Paul.

Clinton continues to dominate on the Democratic side, with 64 percent support. Still, there are some gaps in her support: It's 54 percent among men vs. 70 percent of women and 55 percent among those younger than 50 vs. 72 percent among those 50 and older. And she gets less support from Democratic-leaning independents, 53 percent, than from mainline Democrats, 69 percent.

Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts have 13 and 11 percent support, respectively. Biden does better among those under 50, those with less education and nonwhites; Warren, among college graduates and whites.

It's early days for all this, of course; the 2016 election is two years away. But after the midterms just two weeks off, it’ll be the next item on the dance card.

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GA Senate Candidate Michelle Nunn to Get More Help From EMILY's List


Lester Cohen/Getty Images for WIRED(WASHINGTON) -- While national Democrats have scaled back their support for Alison Lundergan Grimes in Kentucky, another Southern Democratic candidate for the Senate is attracting renewed help from a major Democratic group.

Georgia's Michelle Nunn will see a boost from EMILY's List, the group that supports pro-abortion-rights Democratic women, in her bid against Republican opponent David Perdue, the group said.

"We see a race that's incredibly close," EMILY's List president Stephanie Schriock said on Sunday on ABC's This Week roundtable. "EMILY's List is so excited we're going to double down and put more TV up."

EMILY's List says its new ad will attack Perdue's business record, a cornerstone of the former Dollar General CEO’s campaign, highlighting a gender-pay-discrimination suit against that company. After Perdue left the company, it settled for $19 million in a suit brought by female store managers alleging pay discrimination from 2004 to 2007, while Perdue led the company.

EMILY's List pointed to the suit in a previous Georgia Senate ad, which it ran in August.

The spending is a vote of confidence in Nunn, who has been seen as running a surprisingly competitive race against Perdue in a solidly red state, where no Democrat has won a statewide election since 2000.

Polls have offered little reliable information to quantify how close the race is, or who actually leads. Since April, pollsters have only conducted automated surveys of Georgia, and ABC News does not consider them to be reliable.

Georgia has attracted $25.7 million in outside spending this election cycle, according to Federal Election Commission disclosures, ninth most among all states. In terms of negative advertising, each candidate has seen a little more than $6 million in attack ads from outside groups until now.

Those totals include "independent expenditure" ads that are reported to the Federal Election Commission. Groups can air "issue ads," which do not explicitly urge voters to support or oppose candidates, further from Election Day without disclosing them.

EMILY's List spent nearly $980,000 to air that previous ad in August. The largest spenders on this race have been the Republican super PAC Ending Spending Action Fund, which spent $5.7 million, and the National Republican Senatorial Committee, which spent $2.9 million.

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Infectious Disease Expert Calls Criticism of Ebola Czar 'Misplaced'


Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, defended President Obama's choice of Ron Klain to be the administration's Ebola "czar" despite his lack of medical background, calling him an "excellent manager."

"I think that's a misplaced criticism," Fauci told This Week anchor George Stephanopoulos on Sunday. "What we're talking about now is an Ebola response coordinator, somebody who has extraordinary, as he does, managerial experience ... leadership experience, which he has plenty of."

"He's going to rely on medical experts, like myself and Dr. Frieden and others, to do the medical things," Fauci said, referring to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention chief Dr. Tom Frieden.

Fauci praised White House homeland security adviser Lisa Monaco and National Security Adviser Susan Rice, who had helped lead the administration's Ebola response efforts before Klain's appointment on Friday.

"Lisa Monaco and Susan Rice have been doing that. But they have other big jobs to do. They've been doing a terrific job, but they have other responsibilities We're talking about one designated person who's an excellent manager," Fauci said of Klain.

During the interview on This Week, Fauci also defended the administration's decision to not ban travel from those countries in West Africa that have been hardest hit by Ebola.

"When people come in from a country it's much easier to track them if you know where they're coming from," Fauci said. "But what you do if you then completely ban travel, there's the feasibility of going to other countries where we don't have a travel ban and have people come in."

"The most important thing we want to do is to protect the American public. And we'll discuss any way – and the president has said that," Fauci added.

Fauci also said the new CDC protocols "will be finalized soon," saying that certain aspects of the current guidelines fell short in critical ways.

"The previous protocols were really based on a WHO [World Health Organization] model in which people were taking care of people in a different environment, essentially in the bush, as they say, in remote places almost sometimes outdoors," Fauci said.

"Those people did not have to do the tertiary care, intensive type of training that we do," he said. "So there were parts about that protocol that left vulnerability, parts of the skin that were open.

"Very clearly, when you go into a hospital, have to intubate somebody, have all of the body fluids, you've got to be completely covered. So that's going to be one of the things. The protocol will be finalized soon. But one of the things is going to be complete covering with no skin showing whatsoever," he said.

Fauci also gave an update on the condition of Nina Pham, one of the nurses who contracted Ebola after caring for Thomas Eric Duncan, saying her condition is "fair" and "stable," and she is in "very good spirits."

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Answers to Five Simple Questions About the Midterm Elections


iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- With the midterm elections less than three weeks away, Shushannah Walshe, deputy political director for ABC News, answers five simple questions.

1. So, let's start with the basics. For those who don't know or have been too busy watching the new season of Homeland or reading Gone Girl think pieces: what are the midterm elections and when are they? Sometime next month, right?

SW: Yes, on Tuesday, November 4. But, are you too busy? Aren't we all? In many states there is no need to wait to vote. You can vote early–in many states you can even go today. We are less than three weeks away and according to early voting expert Michael McDonald with the United States Election Project over 1.6 million Americans have already voted. In every district, wherever you live, you can find that information easily accessible online. So, what are you waiting for? Ah maybe you like the excitement of waiting until Election Day.

Now to the big question: what are the midterm elections? Midterm elections happen halfway through the presiden's four-year term and if you are wondering if you can vote or should, well that answer is yes, if you are registered. That’s because every member of the House of Representatives is up for re-election, yes yours! That's not all. There are important Senate and gubernatorial races as well. What's the most important? Well, it’s all important, but we are closely watching whether the Democrats hold on to the Senate or not (more on that below). Republicans need to gain six states in order to do that and there are several tight races–some that may not even be decided until after Election Day--making it impossible to know right now what will happen.

2. Ok, so – as much as everyone is talking about Hillary Clinton – the White House is not actually in play this year. How many seats in the Senate and House of Representatives are up for grabs? A number of governors' races are happening as well right?


SW: Correct, the president has two more years and the next POTUS will be elected in 2016. When will that race start? Oh about a day after the midterms are over. But, let's concentrate on this election. All 435 members in the House of Representatives are up because they are up for re-election every two years (what a grind!) and there are 36 gubernatorial and 36 Senate races. Sixteen of those Senate races are deemed competitive by ABC News ratings and of those 16, five are toss-ups. Of the governor's races our ratings show 21 are competitive with seven toss-ups. Go to ABCNews.com's 14 for 14 coverage to see if any of these hot races are in your state.

3. So the House is currently controlled by the Republicans AKA the GOP. The Senate is controlled by the Democrats. Any clue if either body will change hands?

SW: We don't believe the House will change hands, meaning Republicans will stay in control of the lower chamber. Republicans are actually hoping to gain even more seats next month, while Democrats are aggressively trying to prevent that from happening. There aren't really that many toss-ups despite every seat being up and just a relatively small number that the campaign committees pour money into and watch closely because they tend to flip back and forth between the parties.

But, the real fight to watch on November 4 is whether the Senate changes hands from the Democrats to the Republicans. You may be seeing all those nasty ads at home on your TV and this is likely why, because we are in the last weeks of a death match and Democrats are trying to hold control and the GOP wants to wrest it from them, knowing it's only six seats that could make a difference. It all depends on just a handful of critical races; see below for more on that.

If you are interested in paying attention these final weeks those are the exciting races to watch, with all of them it could be that one race that determines control. What happens if there is a tie? A tie means that the Democrats win because Vice President Joe Biden is actually the tie breaker. Currently Nate Silver and his team at FiveThirtyEight give Republicans a 60.8 percent chance of taking control of the Senate and give Democrats a 39.2 percent chance of keeping the majority.

4. OK, so let's say the Republicans win the Senate. What does that actually **mean** in real terms? What will change in Washington?


SW: There's so much gridlock now, how could there be more? But, yes expect more gridlock because the president, a Democrat, will still be in the White House while Republicans will hold Congress. It’s quite likely even less could get done. It would shift, though. Instead of Congress not getting anything done, the president will likely veto more of what Congress passes.

Of course, Republicans could worry again about more primary challenges so any lawmaking may come to a grinding halt. Many Republicans and Democrats running now are promising to work across the aisle, trying to sell themselves to a public that is sick of congressional fighting. If those promises are true then maybe all these predictions will be wrong, but don’t bet on it. It’s not just voters that are sick of the inaction; there are plenty of senior legislators who are sick of it too. Maybe they will get their way and come to a truce of sorts. Again, unlikely. One other possibility is that President Obama moves toward the Republicans to try and get something–anything–done. We'll be watching.

5. So, we established there are a lot of races happening. Can you name three races you find most compelling and why?

SW: There are a lot of races and narrowing it down to three is difficult, but let’s give it a try. The Georgia Senate race has just recently become a toss-up and it’s all because of an outsourcing controversy that has hit the Republican in the race, businessman David Perdue, pretty hard. He’s running against Michelle Nunn, daughter of former Georgia Sen. Sam Nunn, and for months it looked impossible for a Democrat in red Georgia to win, but now it’s likely to stay tight until Election Day.

Another exciting, and also somewhat unexpected battle, is the Kansas Senate race. In that fight, three-term incumbent Pat Roberts is battling it out against independent Greg Orman. Kansas is also a bright red state, a place not really accustomed to competitive elections never mind this brawl. Orman says he’s an independent choice, while Roberts and his allies are trying to label with him with the L word, liberal. Kansas also has an exciting gubernatorial race, but I won’t count that as my number three.

For my final one, let’s go with a governor’s race. The Florida governor’s race is a fascinating one pitting the Republican incumbent against the former GOP governor of the Sunshine State, Charlie Crist. Crist is back, but this time he’s a Democrat, and everywhere he goes he’s accompanied by a fan. Yes, a fan. As a Floridian, I can attest that it gets hot at home, but this fan has even impacted the race with Scott refusing to come out to their debate Wednesday because of the fan. Yes, fangate.

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Supreme Court Lets Texas Use New Voter ID Law in Nov. Election


iStock/Thinkstock(AUSTIN, Texas) -- The Supreme Court will now allow Texas to use its controversial new voter ID law for the November election.

The high court rejected a request from the Justice Department and civil rights groups to prohibit the state from requiring voters to produce photo IDs in order to cast ballots.

Attorney General Eric Holder said in a statement, "It is a major step backward to let stand a law that a federal court, after a lengthy trial, has determined was designed to discriminate. It is true we are close to an election, but the outcome here that would be least confusing to voters is the one that allowed the most people to vote lawfully."

Early voting in Texas begins Monday.

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Scott Walker and Mary Burke Debate Job Growth, Crime, Taxes in Wisconsin Gubernatorial Race


iStock/Thinkstock(MILWAUKEE) -- Republican Governor Scott Walker and Democrat Mary Burke jostled back and forth Friday during a Wisconsin gubernatorial debate.

The two candidates sparred on topics including taxes, job growth, and crime prevention.

Walker touted his record, pointing out that the state's unemployment rate is the lowest it's been since 2008.

"Compare apples to apples," Walker said. "The only time in the last 25 years the unemployment rate has been worse, is during the three years my opponent was the secretary of commerce. The head of commerce in the state of Wisconsin."

But Burke said Walker failed in his first term, citing that he didn't fulfill a promise to add 250,000 private-sector jobs, and isn't advocating for the middle class.

"He somehow believes, you give tax breaks to those at the top and special interests, and it somehow creates jobs. I'm a business person. I know how jobs get created and it means you have to have that small business growth," Burke said.

Burke also claimed that Walker made public budget cuts to police, fire, and local services, causing an increasing in crime.

"He cut shared revenue to municipalities which really strained their budgets in terms of providing police and fire and local services," Burke said.

But Walker defended Burke's claims, saying, "Because of act in reforms, Milwaukee in the first year alone, saved roughl$y 25 million  In fact, in the most recent budget that Mayor Barrett put out, they actually not only saved money, they have enough money to add to the police department. They actually had raises to public employees in this city of Milwaukee."

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Obama Reassures Americans About the Fight Against Ebola in His Weekly Address


Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) -- In his weekly address, President Obama attempted to explain more clearly the Ebola situation in America, and what his administration has done and is continuing to do to prevent it from spreading.

"What we're seeing now is not an 'outbreak' or an 'epidemic' of Ebola in America," Obama pointed out. He highlighted that only three Americans have been diagnosed with the disease on American soil, urging Americans to "keep this in perspective."

The president also noted, as he has previously, that Ebola is a difficult disease to catch, and that we know how to fight it. "So far," Obama points out, "five Americans who got infected with Ebola in West Africa have been brought back to the United States -- and all five have been treated safely, without infecting healthcare workers"

Fighting Ebola will take time, Obama says. But he reiterates that he will not implement a travel ban for impacted countries, as doing say could make the situation worse.

Read the full transcript of the president's address:

Today, I want to take a few minutes to speak with you-directly and clearly-about Ebola: what we're doing about it, and what you need to know.  Because meeting a public health challenge like this isn't just a job for government.  All of us-citizens, leaders, the media-have a responsibility and a role to play.  This is a serious disease, but we can't give in to hysteria or fear-because that only makes it harder to get people the accurate information they need.  We have to be guided by the science.  We have to remember the basic facts. 

First, what we're seeing now is not an "outbreak" or an "epidemic" of Ebola in America.  We're a nation of more than 300 million people.  To date, we've seen three cases of Ebola diagnosed here-the man who contracted the disease in Liberia, came here and sadly died; the two courageous nurses who were infected while they were treating him.  Our thoughts and our prayers are with them, and we're doing everything we can to give them the best care possible.  Now, even one infection is too many.  At the same time, we have to keep this in perspective.  As our public health experts point out, every year thousands of Americans die from the flu.

Second, Ebola is actually a difficult disease to catch.  It's not transmitted through the air like the flu.  You cannot get it from just riding on a plane or a bus.  The only way that a person can contract the disease is by coming into direct contact with the bodily fluids of somebody who is already showing symptoms.  I've met and hugged some of the doctors and nurses who've treated Ebola patients.  I've met with an Ebola patient who recovered, right in the Oval Office.  And I'm fine.

Third, we know how to fight this disease.  We know the protocols.  And we know that when they're followed, they work.  So far, five Americans who got infected with Ebola in West Africa have been brought back to the United States-and all five have been treated safely, without infecting healthcare workers.

And this week, at my direction, we're stepping up our efforts.  Additional CDC personnel are on the scene in Dallas and Cleveland.  We're working quickly to track and monitor anyone who may have been in close contact with someone showing symptoms.  We're sharing lessons learned so other hospitals don't repeat the mistakes that happened in Dallas.  The CDC's new Ebola rapid response teams will deploy quickly to help hospitals implement the right protocols.  New screening measures are now in place at airports that receive nearly all passengers arriving from Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone.  And we'll continue to constantly review our measures, and update them as needed, to make sure we're doing everything we can to keep Americans safe. 

Finally, we can't just cut ourselves off from West Africa, where this disease is raging.  Our medical experts tell us that the best way to stop this disease is to stop it at its source-before it spreads even wider and becomes even more difficult to contain.  Trying to seal off an entire region of the world-if that were even possible-could actually make the situation worse.  It would make it harder to move health workers and supplies back and forth.  Experience shows that it could also cause people in the affected region to change their travel, to evade screening, and make the disease even harder to track. 

So the United States will continue to help lead the global response in West Africa.  Because if we want to protect Americans from Ebola here at home, we have to end it over there.  And as our civilian and military personnel serve in the region, their safety and health will remain a top priority. 

As I've said before, fighting this disease will take time.  Before this is over, we may see more isolated cases here in America.  But we know how to wage this fight.  And if we take the steps that are necessary, if we're guided by the science-the facts, not fear-then I am absolutely confident that we can prevent a serious outbreak here in the United States, and we can continue to lead the world in this urgent effort.

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GOP Weekly Address: 'We Can Do Better'


US Senate(WASHINGTON) --A Congressional candidate from Long Island, New York, Lee Zeldin, delivered the Republican address this week, in which he spoke of the future, and the importance of fixing Washington for the next generation.

Zeldin called his two daughters "the most important reason [he is] running for Congress." His goal, he says, is to provide his daughters and their generation with "more opportunities than we had."

Criticizing the gridlock in Washington, Zeldin says that the capitol is full of "caution and inaction," and that Americans should be "tired" of the way D.C. operates.

A former Army paratrooper and a current major in the Army Reserves, Zeldin calls for an end to dysfunction, an improved education system, the repeal of Obamacare, support of veterans and job creation.

Read the full transcript of the Republican address:

Hello, I’m Lee Zeldin, and I’m the Republican candidate for New York’s First Congressional District here on Long Island, a special place where I was born and raised.

Let me start by saying that our hearts go out to all those affected by the Ebola outbreak.  Right now, the president and his administration need to be taking every necessary step to protect the American people.

Today, I just want to share with you the most important reason I’m running for Congress.  There are two of them actually, and they’re our beautiful twin daughters, Arianna and Mikayla.  They inspire my wife, Diana, and I every day to do all we can to provide them and their generation with more opportunities than we had.

That’s just the American way, but that is not the path we find ourselves on right now.  

Our government spends more than it takes in, fails to keep basic promises to our veterans, and squanders opportunity after opportunity to create good-paying jobs.  Instead of courage, we see caution and inaction.

Aren’t we tired of the way Washington fails to listen to us?

This November 4th is our chance to send a message that the challenges we face can’t wait.  That it’s time to turn things back in the right direction.

We can start by focusing on creating good-paying, private sector jobs.  Too often in today’s economy, people find themselves taking second, third jobs, and that’s still not enough to make ends meet.  We can do better, and help families get ahead, not just get by.

We need to fight for our veterans who fought for us.  We can’t rest until we know the VA will be able to provide the first-rate, 21st-century care our men and women in uniform deserve.

We need to repeal and replace ObamaCare with solutions that cost less and guarantee more freedom, certainty and security.  

And we have to improve our education system, to put parents in charge of their kids’ education, and give every child an opportunity to succeed.  

I know we can do this.  It’s going to take hard work, tough decisions, and embracing the duty we all share to protect and pass on the blessings on which our country was built.  

That’s why I proudly served as a U.S. Army paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division, why I still serve as a major in the Army Reserves, and why I’m running for Congress now.

Together, we can end the dysfunction, and restore the American Dream for our kids and grandkids. They’re what this is all about.  

Thank you for listening, and have a great weekend.

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Gov. Perry Calls for Air Travel Ban to Stop Spread of Ebola


ABC/Matthew Putney(AUSTIN, Texas) -- Gov. Rick Perry on Friday outlined new recommendations on preparedness and response to the Ebola situation made by the Texas Task Force on Infectious Disease Preparedness and Response.

Perry cited the need to stop Ebola before it spreads, he urged President Obama to put an air travel ban in place from nations impacted by the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. He conveyed that message to Obama in a Thursday night phone call.

Perry has also been on record as calling for enhanced medical screening at all ports of entry and quarantine facilities to ensure public safety.

"Air travel is how this disease crosses borders," Perry said in a statement, "and it's certainly how it got here to Texas." The governor referenced the two Dallas nurses who were infected with Ebola after treating Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person to test positive for the disease in America at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.

The task force also recommended the establishment of two Ebola treatment centers in Texas and specialized patient transport teams, expansion of training in infectious disease protocols for all health care workers, more testing labs for infectious disease, and increased authority for the Texas Department of State Health Service to issue "Enforceable Control Orders."

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Arizona AG Won't Appeal Ruling That Struck Down Ban on Same-Sex Marriages


iStock/Thinkstock(PHOENIX) -- After a district court judge ruled against Arizona's ban on same-sex marriage, the state's attorney general has decided not to further defend the law.

According to a press release posted to Attorney General Tom Horne's website, the decision not to defend the state's law is "based on legal considerations rather than policy considerations."

"A number of Attorneys General have refused to defend laws defining marriage as between a man and a woman," he said. "I have not been among that group. I have fought to defend the laws as passed by the voters of Arizona." However, Horne said, "the first duty of the Attorney General is to be a good lawyer." Further, he highlights a rule that governs lawyers, by which "it is unethical for a lawyer to file a pleading for purposes of delay rather than to achieve a result."

Because both a federal district court and the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals have ruled against the state's law, and the U.S. Supreme Court has declined to review the case of three other circuits in "essentially identical circumstances," Horne admitted that "the probability of persuading the 9th circuit to reverse today's decision is zero...the probability of the United States Supreme Court accepting review of the 9th circuit decision is also zero."

Horne decided, therefore, that "the only purpose to be served by filing another appeal would be to waste the taxpayer's money," prompting his decision not to appeal.

"I am issuing a letter today to the 15 county clerks of court with the directive that based on today's decision by the Federal District Court, they can issue licenses for same sex marriages immediately," he added.

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