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iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The Obama administration said Wednesday that states can't legally block the resettlement of refugees, according to a letter from the Department of Health
and Human Services Office of Refugee Resettlement sent to state officials.

In the letter, the agency said states are bound by the Refugee Act of 1980 to provide "assistance and services" to refugees "without regard to race, religion, nationality, sex or political opinion," and cannot cut off ORR-funded services to Syrian refugees.

Additionally, the letter says refugees are protected by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which "prohibits discrimination on the bases of race and national origin" in all programs that receive federal financial assistance.

More than 30 state governors have indicated they will attempt to block any future refugees from settling in their states.

The House of Representatives passed a bipartisan bill on Nov. 19 that would require the FBI director to certify a background investigation for each potential refugee from Syria or Iraq, and administration officials including the Department of Homeland Security secretary must attest that each potential refugee is not a security threat to the U.S.

The White House and Senate Democrats oppose the measure, which passed through the lower chamber with a veto-proof majority.

House Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., charged that the majority of U.S. governors have taken positions that reflect the views of their constituents.

"It’s hypocritical for Obama Administration officials to threaten enforcement action against these states when they refuse to enforce the vast majority of our immigration laws, such as cracking down on sanctuary cities that openly defy federal law and endanger the American people," he wrote. “The Administration’s latest threat shows why we need the American SAFE Act so that the American people have confidence in their government’s ability to fully screen refugees seeking to come here.”

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Robin Marchant/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Donald Trump responded to critics who accused him of imitating the mannerisms of New York Times reporter Serge Kovaleski in a lengthy statement he tweeted on Thanksgiving day.

“I have no idea who this reporter, Serge [Kovaleski] is, what he looks like or his level of intelligence,” the statement began.

Trump said in the statement that he was merely mocking Kovaleski’s journalism credentials for attempting to shy away from the Washington Post piece he wrote on Sept. 18, 2001 that alleges Muslims were celebrating the attack on the World Trade Center with “tailgate-style parties on rooftops” across the Hudson River in Jersey City, N.J.

“I merely mimicked what I thought would be a flustered reporter trying to get out of a statement he made long ago,” Trump wrote in the statement.



— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 26, 2015

Kovaelski reportedly suffers from a condition that affects joint movement.

“I would definitely not say anything about his appearance,” Trump wrote. “ I have tremendous respect for people who are physically challenged and have spent tens of millions of dollars throughout buildings all over the world on making them handicapped accessible and ADA (Americans Disability Act) compliant.”

A statement also read that Trump demands an apology from the New York Times and accused Kovaleski of using his disability as a “grandstand,” adding that he should “get back to reporting for a paper that is rapidly going down the tubes.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- After serving turkey to homeless veterans and pardoning a turkey on Wednesday, President Obama will privately enjoy Thanksgiving dinner with his family at the White House on Thursday.

So what will the first family be eating this Turkey Day? Check out the menu below:


Thyme Roasted Turkey
Garlic Jus and Cranberry-Orange Relish
Honey-Baked Ham with Apricot-Mustard Glaze
Prime Rib and Creamed Horseradish
Cornbread Stuffing with Chorizo and Roasted Peppers Oyster Stuffing
Braised Winter Greens (Collards, Kale and Turnip Greens)
Macaroni and Cheese
Sweet Potato Gratin
Yukon Gold Mashed Potatoes
Green Bean Casserole
Fresh Greens
Kale Caesar Salad


Banana Cream Pie
Coconut Cream Pie
Pumpkin Pie
Apple Pie
Pecan Pie
Cherry Pie

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- This Thanksgiving, candidates are taking a break from the grind of the 2016 campaign trail to relax at home with their families -- even if it's only for a day.

Marco Rubio, Hillary Clinton and Ben Carson will be with their families in Miami, Chappaqua, New York and Baltimore, respectively. Rubio told voters at a campaign event he will be frying the turkey.

Jeb Bush, like Rubio, will also be in Miami. But this holiday will not be spent with the famous Bush clan. Instead, he will be with his immediate family, which he tells CNN includes his "four unbelievably near perfect grand-children."

Donald Trump is the third presidential candidate spending the holiday in Florida -- but his location of choice is Mar-a-Lago, in Palm Beach, not Miami.

Ted Cruz, who is celebrating the holiday in Texas, is planning on playing Cuban dominoes. Some movies are definitely in the cards as well, with the Hunger Games at the top of the list.

And, of course, the menu features prominently into the day. Cruz is excited for his father's flan. Bush insinuated he may break from his Paleo diet to eat his favorite Chipotle stuffing. Bernie Sanders' family menu includes Ben and Jerry's vanilla ice cream, a fitting dessert choice for the Vermont location. Carly Fiorina will be making her special cranberry sauce, with red pepper flakes, single malt whiskey, raisins, mustard, oranges, onion and fresh strawberries.

And while the campaign trail is draining, some may need a bit more recuperation than others, mainly Mike Huckabee, who just underwent knee surgery. Huckabee will recuperate in Little Rock, Arkansas this holiday, spending the time with his grandchildren.

Noticeably not on the table this Thanksgiving are stops in Iowa or New Hampshire. But the reprieve is short-lived; many candidates, including Trump, Carson and Clinton, pick right back up again this weekend, venturing out to campaign hard before voting officially begins in February.

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Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) -- In this week’s address, President Obama tied the story of the Pilgrims to the plight of refugees fleeing ISIS in the Middle East, saying the settlers who inspired Thanksgiving were “refugees who had fled persecution and violence in their native land.”

“Nearly four centuries after the Mayflower set sail, the world is still full of pilgrims -- men and women who want nothing more than the chance for a safer, better future for themselves and their families,” he said. “What makes America America is that we offer that chance.”

Obama said Americans have been writing the White House offering to take in refugees fleeing the violence in Syria and Iraq.

“Now, people should remember that no refugee can enter our borders until they undergo the highest security checks of anyone traveling to the United States," he said. "That was the case before Paris, and it’s the case now. And what happened in Paris hasn’t stopped Americans from opening their arms anyway.”

Read the full transcript of the president's address below:

Hi, everybody.  In 1620, a small band of pilgrims came to this continent, refugees who had fled persecution and violence in their native land.  Nearly 400 years later, we remember their part in the American story – and we honor the men and women who helped them in their time of need.   
Thanksgiving is a day for food and football, and for hoping the turkey didn’t turn out too dry.  But it’s also a day to count our blessings and give back to others – a reminder that no matter our circumstances, all of us have something to be grateful for.  Maybe it’s good health, a new addition to the family, or a child taking a next step toward college or a career.  Maybe it’s a new job, or a long overdue raise.  Maybe it’s something as simple, and as important, as the chance to spend time with the people who matter most. 
Of course, every American can be thankful for the chance to live in a country founded on the belief that all of us are created equal.  And as President, I’m thankful that I get to see the best of America every day – the courage of our troops and veterans, the resilience of our families, and the basic goodness of the ordinary people who call this country home. 
On this uniquely American holiday, we also remember that so much of our greatness comes from our generosity.  There’s the generosity of Americans who volunteer at food banks and shelters, making sure that no one goes hungry on a day when so many plates are full.  There’s the generosity of Americans who take part not just in Black Friday and Cyber Monday, but Giving Tuesday – recognizing that in the holiday season, what you give is as important as what you get. 
And I’ve been touched by the generosity of the Americans who’ve written me letters and emails in recent weeks, offering to open their homes to refugees fleeing the brutality of ISIL. 
Now, people should remember that no refugee can enter our borders until they undergo the highest security checks of anyone traveling to the United States.  That was the case before Paris, and it’s the case now.  And what happened in Paris hasn’t stopped Americans from opening their arms anyway. 
One woman from Pennsylvania wrote me to say, “Money is tight for us in my household … But I have a guest room.  I have a pantry full of food.  We can do this.”  Another woman from Florida told me her family’s history dates back to the Mayflower – and she said that welcoming others is part of “what it means to be an American.” 
Nearly four centuries after the Mayflower set sail, the world is still full of pilgrims – men and women who want nothing more than the chance for a safer, better future for themselves and their families.  What makes America America is that we offer that chance.  We turn Lady Liberty’s light to the world, and widen our circle of concern to say that all God’s children are worthy of our compassion and care.  That’s part of what makes this the greatest country on Earth.  
I hope that you and your family have a wonderful Thanksgiving, surrounded by loved ones, and full of joy and gratitude.  And together, may we all play our own small part in the American story, and write a next chapter that future generations can be thankful for. 
From the Obama family to yours, have a great Thanksgiving. 

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Politics and religion: two topics that are best avoided with coworkers and new acquaintances. Same goes with family on Thanksgiving.

But, in an election season like this one, politics is in the air and it’s easy to forget this rule of thumb once the turkey is served.

So, ABC News spoke to two etiquette experts -- Jacqueline Whitmore, an author and founder of The Protocol School of Palm Beach, Fla., and Diane Gottsman, who runs the Protocol School of Texas -- to get some tips.

Both said that in a perfect world, Thanksgiving would be a time to catch up and rekindle relationships with loved ones. But they acknowledged that a side dish of politics was inevitable.

 Are political topics ever fair game at the dinner table?

WHITMORE: “I think everything is fair game. Whether it’s appropriate or not is the question. It’s appropriate to have a healthy conversation. Etiquette is all about being mindful of others and also being considerate.”

GOTTSMAN: “The protocol at the dinner table is to make pleasant conversation and interact with each other, so normally we would say to stay away from politics, but the reality is, it’s not going to happen. So, if you’re talking politics and chances are you will, you need to be respectful of other people’s opinions. It should be a conversation not a food fight.”

What are your tips for making the discussion tolerable?

WHITMORE: “As long as you keep it light and positive that’s the most important thing. In a political year, different people have a different way of dealing and discussing different topics. Downer topics are not necessarily the best to discuss.”

GOTTSMAN: “It’s all up for debate, because there’s going to be someone that’s offended with anything someone says. If you have to talk politics, make that 10 percent of your conversation and 90 percent should be on reflection around the table. It’s not okay to be combative with your views and express them at the Thanksgiving table.”

Let’s say politics come up and things are getting awkward. What’s the most polite way to put a stop to an uncomfortable conversation and change the subject?

WHITMORE: “If possible, talk about topics that are most pleasant like holiday memories, food and travel. Or if it’s too uncomfortable volunteer in the kitchen, remove yourself from the situation.”

GOTTSMAN: “I always suggest the host take the lead, saying, ‘It’s clear that we all have an opinion -- that we can agree on -- but I think it’s important to reflect on why we’re sitting here together.’ If you are going to talk politics the bottom line is you should do it respectfully. It’s important to show tolerance and consider each other’s views.”

If you’re the host, what’s the best way to set ground rules without appearing disrespectful?

WHITMORE: “You can always start the conversation on a positive tone by saying, ‘Let’s all talk about what we’re thankful for this year,’ instead of just letting everyone talk about what they want.”

GOTTSMAN: “You already know Uncle Bob is just a staunch Republican, and everyone at the table are Democrats. So, set ground rules with Uncle Bob by saying, ‘We will talk politics for three minutes then we will change the subject.’ Tell everyone it’s going to happen and Uncle Bob has to be accepted for who he is. It’s okay to have family banter -- we wouldn’t have family if we didn’t have banter -- and who knows, you might just learn something you didn’t know.”

Let’s say your in-laws are in town and you are curious to know their thoughts on the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare). What’s the best way to ask at the dinner table without steering the conversation in negative direction?

WHITMORE: “I would probably ask them on the side, not in front of everyone, because you’re going to launch a bigger discussion. Pull them aside when you’re preparing the meal.”

GOTTSMAN: “If you want to know their views it would be best to say, ‘I’m not certain that I’m really working with all of the facts. Will you just share your opinion with me? Maybe I’m just not understanding.’ Being informed is different than combat.”

Any final tips for a relaxing Thanksgiving dinner?

WHITMORE: “Keep [the dinner conversation] light and positive, and if someone gets in a heated discussion change the subject or steer it in another direction.”

GOTTSMAN: “Come to the table with your own idea of what you want to get out of the meal. The Thanksgiving table is not an open forum, it’s interaction, it’s conversation, it’s asking people about their lives. We know what’s on television, we know the political parties of the people sitting at the table. Unyielding views will not grow relationships stronger. You want people to remember you fondly, not grateful that you’re walking out of the door.”

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US Senate(WASHINGTON) -- Sen. Mike Lee delivered the Republican weekly address on Thursday, saying he is thankful for the service members who protect the U.S., the volunteers who help those less fortunate and the parents who provide their kids with loving  and supportive homes.

But while he said Americans have much to be thankful for this Thanksgiving, he noted that living costs are rising in the U.S. while pay remains stagnant.

"We have too many Americans trapped in poverty, sometimes for generations, and often because the dysfunctional government programs that are supposed to help them, only make it harder and less likely for them and their children to build a better life," Lee, R-Utah, said.

“I know it’s going to take hard work to overcome the problems besetting our economy,” he added. “But the American people never shrink from our greatest challenges. We always confront them, head on. In America freedom has never meant ‘you’re on your own.’ For us, freedom means, and has always meant, ‘we’re all in this together.’”

Watch his full address below:

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tupungato/iStock/ThinkStock(WASHINGTON) -- The terrorist attacks in Paris, which left 130 dead, have reignited a Congressional debate over how much information the government should be able to access from citizens -- and how to balance national security concerns with individual freedoms.

Some members of Congress are calling for the government to continue a program that collects vast amount of phone data that is set to expire shortly, and others are saying the problem is the existence of smartphone applications and other consumer technology that allows people to carry out conversations that can go completely undetected.

Unless Congress acts, the National Security Agency program that allows the government to collect Americans' phone records in bulk is set to expire on Dec. 1.

Sen. Tom Cotton and a growing number of co-sponsors are now calling for the delay of that program's expiration until at least the end of January 2017.

Powerful Republicans including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr and Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain have all signed on as co-sponsors, a Cotton spokeswoman said.

"Now is not the time to sacrifice our national security for political talking points. We should allow the Intelligence Community to do their job and provide them with the tools they need to keep us safe," Cotton said in a statement last week.

But given the program's looming expiration date, the Senate is not likely to have a chance to vote on his bill. The Senate returns to work on the afternoon of Monday, Nov. 30 -- just hours before the program expires.

"The timeline isn't ideal but it seems likely the NSA would be able to turn the bulk collection system back on if it was permitted to after a period of dormancy," Cotton spokeswoman Caroline Rabbitt told ABC.
So far the list of co-sponsors does not include any Democrats.

There is bipartisan support, however, for changes to the burgeoning industry of encryption applications that are marketed to users looking for ways to avoid government surveillance. These readily available apps are believed to be increasingly co-opted by terrorists who use them to shield their communications from government eyes.

"It is likely that end-to-end encryption was used to communication between those individuals in Belgium, in France, and in Syria,” Burr, the Intelligence Committee chairman, said last week after a classified briefing on the Paris attacks.

"It's a black Web and there's no way of piercing it," added the committee's top Democrat, Dianne Feinstein, over the weekend.

She said technology companies, many of which are located in her home state of California, must be open to changing their products so that the government can access communications from suspicious users -- what FBI chief James Comey has referred to as a "back door."

"I am hopeful that the companies, most of whom are my constituents -- not most, but many -- will understand what we're facing," she said, adding that she envisions such surveillance requiring a court order - a nod to the difficult balance lawmakers face between ensuring civil liberties and protecting national security.

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Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- President Obama trotted out his best jokes at the 2015 White House turkey pardon Wednesday afternoon in the Rose Garden, even getting some laughs from his daughters -– who appeared at times disinterested in last year’s proceedings.

“It is hard to believe that this is my seventh year of pardoning turkeys,” Obama said. “Time flies, even if turkeys don’t.”

“That was good, that was good,” Sasha, his youngest daughter, said with a giggle.

“I thought it was good,” the president replied.

This year’s lucky turkey was “Abe,” an 18-week-old, 40-pound turkey raised in California’s Central Valley under the supervision of the National Turkey Federation.

“Abe is now a free bird. He’s TOTUS -– the Turkey of the United States,” Obama said.

“If for some reason Abe can't fulfill his duties to walk around and gobble all day, Honest is in an undisclosed location ready to serve in the TOTUS line of succession,” he continued.

The Obama daughters were criticized after last year's pardoning for looking bored at times. (One former Republican Capitol Hill staffer criticized them for their expressions, and later resigned over the remarks.)
This year, the First Daughters seemed to enjoy this year’s event, joking with each other and their father throughout the ceremony.

In his second-to-last turkey pardon -– potentially his last with both daughters, as Malia will start college next year -– the president thanked Sasha and Malia for their participation.

“They do this solely because it makes me feel good. Not because they actually think that this is something I should be doing,” he said.

“As you get older you appreciate when your kids just indulge you like this, so I'm very grateful,” he continued.

Abe was picked to participate in the Rose Garden ceremony over his alternate, “Honest,” in an online poll. Both turkeys –- who were named by California school children -– will live out their days at a historic Virginia turkey farm after receiving their presidential pardons.

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The White House(WASHINGTON) -- President Obama said Americans should not be concerned that a similar attack to the one in Paris would happen on U.S. soil.

"As we go into Thanksgiving weekend, I want the American people to know is that we are taking every possible step to keep our homeland safe," he said.

The president made those remarks after getting an update from his national security team on the homeland security posture in the wake of the Paris attacks and as the nation enters the holiday season.

"Today’s meeting will provide an opportunity for members of the president's national security team to review efforts to monitor threats, continually evaluate our security posture, and protect the American people. Per his instructions, the president will continue to be regularly apprised of these efforts," a White House official said before the meeting.

The official also noted that the administration is not aware of any credible, specific intelligence that indicates a Paris-like plot on the U.S. homeland.

The president spoke from the Roosevelt Room in the White House, after the approximately hour-long national security meeting in the Situation Room, which included updates from Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, FBI Director James Comey and Attorney General Loretta Lynch.

The security update came just a day after Obama met with French President Francois Hollande, during which the two called for all western nations to step up their commitments in the fight against ISIS.

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- The famed Beacon Drive-In in Spartanburg, South Carolina was packed; Jeb Bush stood amidst an aging crowd, making his pitch on Common Core when he diverged.

“I was all-in on the education subject. I was like the pig in the breakfast experience not the chicken. If you know what I mean...I was the bacon,” he said. Silence filled the air.

“Get it?” he asked.

A few pity-laced chuckles ensued.

“I thought that was funny,” Bush joked, unfazed.

This is just one of Bush’s more bewildering aphorisms. The former Florida governor has a vast catalog brimming with obscure colloquiums (most are animal-focused), some of which he attributes to his Florida residence and all of which may bolster his self-characterization as a “nerd.”

Some amuse, others confuse, but Jeb-isms run in no short supply. These moments may come off as awkward on a great debate stage, but for the voters and reporters who cover him, his phrases can be endearing -- a streak of humanity for a candidate who Donald Trump famously derided as “low-energy.”

Let’s take a look at three of the more common phrases:

“Let The Big Dog Eat”

This phrase is Bush’s most-used on the campaign trail. It commonly makes its way into his lexicon when referring to regulatory and economic reform.

At a recent town hall in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Bush said, “People just need to lighten the load up and let people rise up as we say in North Florida, we just need to let the big dog eat. A big dog is inside of each of us.”

As oft-used as this phrase is, when Bush campaigns in New Hampshire as he often does, this particular saying can be met with a mix of bemusement and bewilderment.

“Unleash the Animal Spirits”

Bush uses this phrase when he’s speaking broadly about his plan to bolster the economy and hit 4 percent growth.

During his energy rollout in Pennsylvania in late September, he said, "This is what makes America so extraordinary and so special. We just have to unleash the animal spirits as Americans and we will be America renewed again."

And in North Carolina, “The animal spirits still exist inside America.”

In Iowa, Bush’s usage of the phrase served to complicate a reference to our previous expression.

A voter asked him what “let the big dog eat” means. “It means releasing the animal spirits of this country, how about that?” Bush answered.

He continued by saying, “This country is extraordinary and it’s because we have this unique ability to take risks, to innovate, to try different things, to dust ourselves off, two-steps-forward one-step-back. We’re a dynamic country and we’re losing our dynamism. That’s what I meant.”

"Frogs…Or Crabs In a Barrel"

In Conway, South Carolina, Bush was asked about Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders’ plan to make college free. He called such tactics “insidious," slamming the notion that the government “can just take care of us.”

And then the metaphor came.

“It’s like the crabs in the, you know, whatever -- the crabs in the boiling water,” Bush began.

A voter tried to help. “Frogs!” she shouted.

“The frogs,” Mr. Bush continued. “You think it’s warm, and it feels pretty good and then it feels like you’re in a whirlpool -- you know, a Jacuzzi or something.”

“And then you’re dead,” he concluded. “That’s how this works.”

The Bush campaign did not respond to requests for comment.

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Liz Kreutz/ABC News(MANCHESTER, N.H.) -- After a recent campaign event in New Hampshire, Hillary Clinton slipped backstage at the Nashua Radisson, where 18 of her biggest fans were waiting.

“I’m so happy you all could come,” Clinton said after posing for a photo with the group who had traveled from Arkansas to be there. “Thank you, thank you.”

For the next five minutes or so, Clinton chatted with them about life: the Razorbacks, her granddaughter, husband Bill, general happenings on the campaign trail. They updated her on their plans. She then hugged each of them and said goodbye. It was back to work -- for everyone.

But this was no ordinary group of supporters. These were the “Arkansas Travelers,” a cadre of loyal Democrats -- some of whom are longtime friends and colleagues of the Clintons -- who got together in 1992 to travel the country to campaign for the future president’s first White House bid.

In 1992, the group’s efforts turned out to be a real boon for Bill Clinton, who was still relatively unknown to many across the country (“Travelers” recall knocking on doors in Iowa and meeting person after person who had never even heard of him).

Ever since, the group has become a staple part of a Clinton presidential campaign -- reuniting for Bill Clinton in 1996, for Hillary Clinton in 2008, and now in 2016. And in an election year that’s never seen more of an emphasis on digital campaign strategies, these “Travelers” are doing things the old-fashioned way. After all, it’s worked for them before.

When Hillary Clinton greeted them in Nashua, members of the group had already been out campaigning for five straight days -- door knocking, canvassing, attending house parties and dinners all across the Granite State on behalf of the former secretary of state. And this visit was just the beginning; the “Travelers” plan to campaign for Clinton in additional states over the next year.

The job of getting the band back together fell to Sheila Bronfman, the founder and organizer of the “Arkansas Travelers,” who got to work rallying the troops in April after Clinton officially announced her candidacy. By November, she had recruited more than 400 volunteers -- many of them first-timers.

But some of the old-timers are on the move this year too, including Bronfman, who wears a whistle around her neck, which she uses to gather up her fellow “Travelers.” Ann Henry, 76, and her husband, Morriss, 83, -- the couple who hosted the Clintons' wedding reception in Fayetteville, Arkansas, in 1975 -- are also back on the campaign trail.

“We're people that have met her, we know her personally, and the other people around here perhaps have only seen her on TV,” Morriss Henry, a physician who served in the Arkansas state legislature, told ABC News in an interview. “They're interested in finding out who she really is in person, and to talk to somebody that has had that experience, like we have, of knowing both Bill and Hillary. And I've known them for a long time.”

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Photo by Kris Connor/WireImage(WASHINGTON) -- Barbra Streisand said Tuesday that she’d have a hard time imagining Donald Trump as President of the United States, but thinks a general election matchup between the real estate mogul and Hillary Clinton would be "one of the greatest moments in television history."

The actress and singer, who received the Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama at the White House Tuesday evening, said the thought of receiving the nation’s highest civilian honor from Trump was “terrifyingly scary.”

“What if that was Donald Trump up there, I couldn't help but think, ‘what would he say?’” she said. “The president [Obama] is so eloquent, so dignified.”

“I probably would've choked,” she added. “It's terrifyingly scary, but it's funny. But scary.”

Streisand, a vocal supporter of President Obama, is also one of Hillary Clinton’s biggest boosters in Hollywood.

“I want Hillary Clinton to be president,” she said. “We need a woman president, we need compassion, we need to have a person who comes from the heart.”

She said a Clinton/Trump general election matchup would be “one of the greatest moments in television history.”

“Everybody would watch,” she said. “I can’t even imagine. I mean, I’m not worried about her.”

Streisand was one of 17 people awarded the Medal of Freedom by the president, a group that also included director Steven Spielberg, Hall of Fame center fielder Willie Mays and musician James Taylor.

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ABC News(ROCK HILL, S.C.) -- As GOP candidate Donald Trump doubles down on claims that he saw Americans in New Jersey cheering on 9/11, his rival, Jeb Bush, strongly denounced those comments Tuesday while campaigning in South Carolina.

"I don’t recall that. There was no cheering on any -- it would have been on television, it would have been recorded,” Bush said.

A memory, he said, he instead recalls is that of peaceful Muslim-Americans.

“What I remember were a lot of peaceful Muslims that were disheartened and grieved and sad and angry just as every other American was as well,” the former governor of Florida said.

Trump defended comments he made on Saturday -- that he saw thousands of people in Jersey City, New Jersey cheering when the World Trade Center was destroyed on Sept. 11, 2001.

"There were people that were cheering on the other side of New Jersey where you have large Arab populations,” Trump told George Stephanopoulos on ABC’s This Week. "They were cheering as the World Trade Center came down. I know it might be not politically correct for you to talk about it, but there were people cheering as that building came down -- as those buildings came down, and that tells you something. It was well covered at the time.”

These claims have been widely debunked. ABC News, among many other news organizations, has investigated and no evidence of such cheering in Jersey City has been found.

While there were images of people cheering the towers’ collapse in parts of the Middle East, there is no record of such celebrations in New Jersey. There were some Internet rumors of Muslims celebrating the towers’ fall in Paterson, New Jersey, but those were discounted by local police at the time.

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Ty Wright/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- As Donald Trump stands by comments he made about 9/11, other Republican presidential hopefuls deny the claims.

Trump is not backing down after he said he saw people cheering in Jersey City, New Jersey on Sept. 11, 2001. On the campaign trail in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina on Tuesday, Trump said he's received "hundreds of phone calls" from people agreeing with him since he made the comments in the past few days.

These claims have been widely debunked. ABC News, among many other news organizations has investigated and no evidence of such cheering in Jersey City has been found.

Earlier Tuesday, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush said he strongly condemned Trump's claims and he remembered "a lot of peaceful Muslims that were disheartened and grieved and sad and angry just as every other American was as well."

In an interview Tuesday with Bret Baier on Fox News, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said he didn't recall Muslims celebrating in Jersey City.

“As I said before if that had happened, I'd recall it and I don’t," he told Baier.

Dr. Ben Carson on Monday told reporters he saw "newsreels" of American Muslims cheering in New Jersey during the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, then a few hours later his campaign apologized and said he "doesn't stand behind" what he said and his remarks were "a mistake."

Trump responded to Carson backpedaling from his comments.

"For Ben Carson to make this statement and then deny it, could be the pathological disease that he wrote about acting up again,” he said in a statement.

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To Play The Cougars

Airtime 5:30p


The KSYL Morning Report

Monday Thru Friday 7:10a


With Host

Dave Graichen

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The CBS World News Roundup

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Commercial Free


The Best Of The 60's & 70's


Now On Air At 93.1 HD3

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State Wire
North Rapides Business & Industry Alliance



All Weekend Long

It's a

Political Free Zone!

Kim Komando, The "Weekend" Roundup, Leo Laporte (The Tech Guy!), Art Bell, The Real Estate Show, Bill Handel, Chef John Folse "Stirin' It Up" , Doug Stephan's Weekend, The Pet Show & When Radio Was!.

New Shows!

Rudy Maxa’s World

Now A Full 2 Hours

Saturday 12 to 2p




Dr. Ronald Hoffman

Intelligent Medicine

Saturday 2 to 4p



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