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(GARLAND, TX) -- Two men were shot and killed by police officers outside an art exhibit of Muhammad cartoons in Garland, Texas, Sunday evening after driving up to the building and firing at a security officer, according to the Garland Police Department. The security officer suffered non-life threatening injuries.

The incident happened as the exhibit at the Curtis Culwell Center was drawing to a close. The exhibit was immediately placed on lock-down and attendees later moved to a nearby school.

As of 9 p.m. local time, a bomb squad was at the scene due to reports that the vehicle driven by the attackers may contain explosives.

The Muhammad Cartoon Exhibit and $10,000 cartoon contest was hosted by the American Freedom Defense Initiative. Its founder, Pamela Geller, is a political activist known for her anti-Islam views.

Geller said before the event she paid an additional $10,000 for security, calling it "the high cost of freedom."

The exhibit was scheduled shortly after radical Islamists killed 12 people at the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris for their frequent depictions of Muhammad, which is considered sacrilegious by Muslims.

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Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images(BALTIMORE) -- Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake today lifted the citywide curfew that was instituted after riots erupted Monday following the funeral of Freddie Gray.

In a pair of posts to her verified Twitter account, Rawlings-Blake said that the curfew would be ended immediately. She thanked the citizens of Baltimore for their patience and reiterated that her goal was "to not have the curfew in place a single day longer than was necessary."

 

Effective immediately, I have rescinded my order instituting a city-wide curfew. I want to thank the people of Baltimore for their patience.

— Mayor Rawlings-Blake (@MayorSRB) May 3, 2015

My goal has always been to not have the curfew in place a single day longer than was necessary. I believe we have reached that point today.

— Mayor Rawlings-Blake (@MayorSRB) May 3, 2015



Sunday, she said, the city of Baltimore has finally reached that point.

At a Sunday press conference, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan said he agreed with Rawlings-Blake's decision to lift the curfew and that the National Guard would begin to withdraw. "The mayor and I both talked and agreed we think it's time to get the community back to normal again."

While most of the protests in the wake of Gray's death were non-violent, the clashes that took place on Monday night claimed many area businesses, Hogan noted. "Monday night we lost 200 businesses, most of them were minority-owned businesses, many of them didn't have insurance."

"Hundreds of millions of dollars have been lost," Hogan added.

On Saturday, Hogan called for a statewide "Day of Prayer and Peace," beginning on Sunday. "As we begin to rebuild and restore," he said in a statement, "let us renew our faith in the true spirity of our city and its people. I pray that tomorrow will be a day of reflection and will serve as a foundation for how we all conduct ourselves in the days and months to come."

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Obtained by ABC News(NEW YORK) -- An upstate New York millionaire father of four who has been tried twice before for the 2001 killing of his wife is facing a jury for the third time, and a verdict could come Monday as deliberations resume.

Cal Harris, 53, of Spencer has been convicted twice before for the murder of his estranged wife Michele, who disappeared September 11, 2001, but both convictions were thrown out.

After her disappearance, no body or murder weapon was discovered, even after extensive searches of Harris's 252-acre property in Tioga County. But police said forensics teams found blood in the house, which suggested Michele had been attacked by her husband, and a witness said he heard Harris threaten her that he would kill her.

The trial in Schoharie County Courthouse lasted 11 weeks, and the jury has already deliberated two days without reaching a verdict.

Harris was originally arrested in 2005 and was found guilty in July 2007 of second degree murder. Before sentencing, however, a witness came forward with new information, forcing the judge to throw out the conviction.

Harris was re-tried in 2009 and again convicted. But that conviction was also thrown out -- three years later, this time by an appeals court that ruled a juror had been seated who expressed preconceived opinions about the case and certain testimony was admitted without the jury being warned it was hearsay.

In an interview with ABC News' Matt Gutman in January, on the eve of his third trial, Cal Harris said he and his wife were ending their marriage, but he denied any involvement in his wife's disappearance or death.

"Did you kill Michele?" Gutman asked.

"Absolutely not," Harris said. "Absolutely not."

His four children also said they believe their father is innocent.

"We didn't have any doubt he wasn't involved," his son Tanner told ABC News.

"We feel like we need to tell people that he's actually a really great guy and there's no way he could have done something like this," his daughter Cayla said.

The Harris children told ABC News that they have never even asked their father about that September night almost 15 years ago.

"[We] didn't have to," Taylor Harris said.

"From an indictment, to the first trial, to the second trial, and here I sit, here we sit having to face another trial." Cal Harris said. "No one should have to go through this. No one."


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Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A trio of small earthquake have shook the southern United States Saturday night into Sunday, with two tremors in Mississippi and one more in Texas.

According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the two Mississippi quakes took place less than 10 miles southwest of the city of Canton. The first, a magnitude 3.2 earthquake, hit at about 8:40 p.m. ET Saturday, and the second, a magnitude 3.0 followed about 40 minutes later.

The Mississippi Emergency Management Agency initially stated that there had been no reports of injuries or damage.

At about 11:11 a.m. Sunday, another tremor hit just north of Irving, Texas. That quake was measured at a magnitude 3.2.

Last month, scientists at Southern Methodist University in Dallas released a report indicating that a string of earthquakes seen in Texas and Oklahoma were caused by fluid injection and removal of wastewater.

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A man in a dress and a wig robbed a south Florida bank on May 1, 2015. FBI Miami(MIAMI) --  Authorities in south Florida are searching for a man who wore a bright dress and a long wig while robbing a bank.

According to the FBI, at about 9:15 a.m. Saturday, a man demanded money from a bank employee at a BB&T bank in Cutler Bay, Florida, about 20 miles south of Miami.

Customers were in the bank at the time, the FBI said, but no one was injured.

Photos released by the FBI capture the robber disguised in a long, black wig, a colorful striped dress, and sunglasses.

The robber had an accomplice who was also wearing a dress and wig, the FBI said, but no photos of the accomplice were available.

The FBI said the amount of money, if any was stolen, has not been disclosed.

Anyone with information about the bank robber's identity can call the FBI at 754-703-2000.

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tom hall/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A plainclothes New York Police Department officer was in critical condition Saturday night after he was shot by a man who opened fire on his unmarked car, city officials said.

Officer Brian Moore, a five-year veteran, was on duty with his partner Eric Jansen, 30, as part of an anti-crime unit in the Queens Village section of the city when he was shot at around 6:15 p.m., police said.

Moore and his partner were in their unmarked patrol car when they saw a man walking in the street adjust something in the waistband of his pants that appeared to be a gun, NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton said Saturday night.

When the officers told the man to stop, he turned, pulled out a gun and began shooting into the car, Bratton said.

Moore, 25, was shot in the face, and was rushed by police cruiser to Jamaica Hospital Center, where he was visited by Mayor Bill de Blasio.

 

Mayor @BilldeBlasio is at Jamaica Hospital Center, where an NYPD Officer was taken after sustaining a gunshot wound this evening.

— NYC Mayor's Office (@NYCMayorsOffice) May 3, 2015

 

 

Please keep the injured police officer, his family, and the entire New York City Police Department in your thoughts tonight.

— NYC Mayor's Office (@NYCMayorsOffice) May 3, 2015



"It is a painful day for all of us," said de Blasio.

Moore listed in critical but stable condition after undergoing surgery.

The suspect fled on foot, sparking a massive manhunt through the neighborhood, with officers searching houses, on roofs, in backyards, and checking under cars.

Witnesses told police that a man matching the suspect's description had gone into a house, and the suspect, identified as Demetrius Blackwell, was arrested there, Bratton said.

Bratton said Blackwell has a long arrest record.

 

NYPD Commissioner William Bratton tweeted on Saturday night that the officer's family was at the hospital.

 

Our injured officer who was shot tonight while keeping NYC safe is in our prayers. At Jamaica Hospital now with family.

— Commissioner Bratton (@CommissBratton) May 3, 2015

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Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images(BALTIMORE) -- About 20 people were arrested Saturday night as dozens of people violated the 10 p.m. curfew still being enforced in Baltimore, after a day of large, peaceful demonstrations where many called for the order to be lifted.

Over 1,000 marchers gathered near North Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue, the site of looting and rioting earlier in the week in response to the death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man who suffered a spinal injury and later died while in police custody last month.

There were no clashes with police, unlike Friday night, when police enforced the curfew and arrested nearly 40 people.

The defiance of the curfew, which was put in place Tuesday, came after prosecutors announced charges against six police officers in Gray's death, which was ruled a homicide. The six officers connected to the case faced a range of charges including several counts of manslaughter, second-degree assault, misconduct in office and false imprisonment, Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby announced.

The most serious charge is second-degree depraved heart murder, which only Officer Caesar R. Goodson, Jr., the driver of the police van, faces.

During demonstrations Saturday, many people called for the curfew to be lifted, but Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts said more time was needed to make sure that calm has been restored in the city.

"We all want to get back to normal and have the city running in the right direction," Batts said. "We recognize the concerns over the curfew. For tonight, for everyone's safety, we're going to keep the curfew in place."

State Police Colonel William Palozzi said that the decision to keep the curfew in place was made out of safety concerns.

"We just ask for patience as we move forward and continue to move in a safer direction for a safer city," he said.

People in the crowd at the large, peaceful protest in Baltimore said the demonstration was about bigger change, beyond the issue of the six police officers charged in the Freddie Gray case. They talked about employment opportunities and about the problems that kids are finding with alternatives to crime out in the street.

People circulated through the crowds and others set up a table with voter registration cards in an effort to get people to sign up to vote. Those encouraging voter registration told people that if they registered, not only would they have the opportunity to choose future leadership but they also would have the opportunity to serve on criminal juries.

The Baltimore Police Department also used the rally Saturday as a way to do community outreach. Officers said they found that as they circulate through the crowd they can have personal contact with people who in some cases have been mistrusting in the past. In that way, some officers said, they hope to build a new relationship with this community.

Although many people called the demonstration a "victory rally," at least one Baltimore resident said that may be premature.

"I feel like it ain't over yet," Baltimore resident Brian Watts said. "We've still got a lot -- a lot to go."

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Two Michigan women, missing for almost two weeks, are found and airlifted to safety on Friday, April 24, 2015. Courtesy Michigan State Police(DETROIT) -- Two women stranded in the Michigan wilderness for two weeks say they could hear bears scratching on their car's door at night.

Leslie Roy, 52, and her sister Lee Marie Wright, 56, were on vacation in a remote part of Michigan when they became stranded in their SUV by heavy snow on April 11.

"The bears would show up about midnight," Roy told ABC News. "They would wake us up. We could hear them scratching on the truck."

The sisters were stranded for two weeks but they told ABC News they tried to call for help.

"We tried 911 and actually it just rang, it never made the connection," Wright said.

When calls failed, the sisters tried other methods, writing "help 9-1-1" on a T-shit and hanging it on a nearby stop sign as a make-shift S-O-S signal.

The sisters said their car battery died four days after they became stranded -- leaving them without light, radio or heat.

"If we didn't have the food in the truck, it would have been a totally different story," Roy said.

According to police, the two women rationed food -- Girl Scout cookies and cheese puffs -- and melted snow for water as they tried to stay warm in their SUV.

After combing the woods for days, searchers spotted the women's SUV from a helicopter two weeks after they got stuck.

"We heard them hollering and that was excellent," Wright said.

"We're here, we're here!" Roy added.

The sisters were airlifted to a Helen Newberry Joy hospital, according to a press release.

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Tomislav Zivkovic/iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) --  A magnitude-3.9 earthquake struck just outside Los Angeles Sunday morning.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the earthquake was centered near Park-Windsor Hills, about seven miles west-southwest of Los Angeles, at 4:07 a.m. local time.

The Los Angeles Fire Department said no damage had been reported.

 

No damage has been reported. LAFD is no longer in earthquake mode.

— LAFD (@LAFD) May 3, 2015

 

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Charlottesville Police Department(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) -- The parents of University of Virginia student Hannah Graham, who was found dead after she went missing in September, are launching an award in her honor at the Charlottesville, Virginia, college.

The 18-year-old sophomore disappeared Sept. 13, and more than a month later, her remains were found in a field about 10 miles from Charlottesville. Jesse Matthew Jr. has been charged with first-degree murder in connection with Graham's death.

At a launch event for the memorial award, Graham's father John Graham spoke to a crowd of friends, faculty and administrators as he expressed hope that the award could represent everything his daughter wanted to achieve, according to a UVA news release issued Friday.

The award will benefit students who share Graham's passions, including French culture, global health and service work, according to the release.

The first recipient will get $10,000 for his or her commitment to participate in two semesters of related coursework at UVA and at least eight weeks of field work in a French-speaking developing country, the news release says.

"Hannah loved UVA, she loved Charlottesville and she would be honored I think to know this work is going to moving forward in her memory," her mother Sue Graham said, according to ABC affiliate WIRC-TV in Richmond.

The money is provided by the Hannah Graham Memorial Fund, which was established by the university last year and is supported by the Grahams and their family, according to the UVA news release. The award money could go to more than one student as funding increases, the news release said.


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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images(BALTIMORE) -- The defense for the six Baltimore police officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray will likely claim that the decision to indict was based on politics, not facts, a legal analyst said Saturday.

The death of Gray, 25, a week after he was taken into custody, was ruled a homicide Friday, and Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby announced criminal charges against six officers connected to the case.

The charges vary for each officer, but include several counts of manslaughter, second-degree assault, misconduct in office and false imprisonment, among others. The most serious charge is second-degree depraved heart murder, which only Officer Caesar R. Goodson, Jr., the driver of the police van, faces.

ABC's Chief Legal Analyst Dan Abrams said he believes "the rush to judgment is going to be the heart of the defense."

Gray was injured while in police custody on April 12. He died on April 19. An investigation was launched that resulted in charges in less than two weeks, while there were daily protests in the city that occasionally turned violent.

"I mean that's what the defense is going to be here, which is that not enough time was taken to allow the prosecutor to fairly and objectively evaluate the evidence," Abrams said. "The defense is going to [say] that charge was because of the riots."

The other officers charged besides Goodson are: Officer William G. Porter, Lt. Brian W. Rice, Officer Edward M. Nero, Officer Garrett E. Miller and Sgt. Alicia D. White. And according to Abrams, part of the defense strategy will be evaluating each of the officers separately.

"The allegations against each of them are totally different, so you're not going to be able to lump all of them in together and say did they collectively do something," Abrams said. "Each one of those officers is going to have a separate defense where they're going to say wait a second, why am I being charged with X crime -- in many of these cases manslaughter -- and then going through moment by moment what that officer did or didn't do. And I think they're going to be some very powerful defenses."

Abrams says it will be tough to convict the officers.

"Some of the lesser convictions will likely stick in certain cases. But I think some of the more serious charges, most of the more serious charges, it's going to be really tough to get convictions on a lot of these charges. I think it is fair to say that this prosecutor as a legal matter has overreached," Abrams said.

"Two officers here are charged with manslaughter, who come on the scene later and don't do enough, according to prosecutors. That may be wrong but getting a jury to convict them of manslaughter for simply not helping enough is going to be very, very tough," he added.

Mosby, who comes from a long line of police officers herself, defended the indictments at a press conference.

"My job a prosecutor is to follow and uphold the law... that means equally applying justice to those with and without a badge," she said.

But, the Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police doubts Mosby's office's ability to be objective. In an open letter to Mosby Monday, the FOP asked her to appoint a special independent prosecutor, saying the organization has "very deep concerns about the many conflicts of interest presented by your office conducting an investigation in this case."

However, Abrams says he doesn't think that the conflicts of interest will "be a serious claim here."

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Tomislav Zivkovic/iStock/Thinkstock(GALESBURG, Mich.) -- A magnitude 4.2 earthquake hit west of Detroit on Saturday, causing tremors to be felt from Chicago to Toledo, Ohio.

The quake struck shortly after 12 p.m. Saturday about five miles south of the town of Galesburg.  The epicenter was about 3.7 miles underground, 15 miles southeast of Kalamazoo and 57 miles southwest of Lansing.

The midwest is an infrequent target for earthquakes, though the U.S. Geological Survey says that when they do strike in the area, they are often felt over a wider region than quakes west of the Rocky Mountains.

Paul Caruso with the USGS notes that Saturday's quake could cause "slight damage," referencing a similar quake -- magnitude 4.6 -- that hit the area in 1947.

"We have reports that the quake has been felt throughout the state of Michigan," Caruso said. "We have reports from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and Northern Illinois, Indiana and Ohio."

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Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(BALTIMORE) -- Baltimore police Friday began arresting people who defied a citywide curfew, including several at City Hall.

Most people complied with the 10 p.m. curfew, but those who resisted were met with swift police action.

Baltimore Police spokesman Sgt. Jarron Jackson said that there were 53 arrests made Friday - 38 were protest-related and 15 were for curfew violation.

Baltimore police tweeted that protesters remained at War Memorial Plaza, in front of City Hall, "in violation of the curfew," and had been warned that the curfew was to begin by officers with bullhorns.

 

A group of protesters remain in front of City Hall in violation of the curfew.

— Baltimore Police (@BaltimorePolice) May 2, 2015

Officers are arresting protesters who refused to leave after the curfew went into effect.

— Baltimore Police (@BaltimorePolice) May 2, 2015

 

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MMADIA/iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(KAHULUI, Hawaii) -- A Hawaiian Airlines flight bound for Oakland, California, on Friday was forced to return to the ground shortly after takeoff due to an odor of smoke.

The crew declared an emergency soon after takeoff, the airline says, and returned to Kahului Airport. All 224 passengers on board were evacuated using the plane's emergency slides. Two passengers were hospitalized with minor injuries.

Airline officials say that they are investigating the source of the odor.

ABC affiliate KITV in Hawaii reports that Hawaiian Airlines apologized to its customers in a statement, saying that "safety is our highest priority and we were pleased with the swift and decisive actions of the crew."

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Class Ring Stock Photo: Hemera Technologies/Photos.com/Thinkstock(WILKES-BARRE, Pa.) -- A man who lost his college class ring in a flood more than 40 years ago has it back, thanks to a police investigation into a series of Pennsylvania burglaries.

Roger Stout lost the ring in 1972. On Friday, however, the ring was returned to him. Police had been investigating a string of burglaries, and the ring turned up after they made an arrest.

Police, with the help of Wilkes University alumni officials, were able to track down Stout and return the ring.

"I wore that ring every day, so it's good to have it back on," Stout said. "I'm very happy all the way around."

He wasn't sure, though, how the burglar would have gotten the ring. "We live about a block from the river," he noted, "so where it went after that, probably eventually came to rest on the river banks."

Stout told ABC affiliate WNEP-TV that the ring was lost when it went through an open window during the 1972 flood.

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