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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The good news is, employers are hiring, but why did the week close with a drop in the market?

The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 272.38 to finish the session at 16102.38.

The Nasdaq fell 49.58, ending at 4683.92, while the S&P 500 lost 29.91 to close at 1921.22.

A report out from the Labor Department on Friday revealed 220,000 jobs were created last month, but it's not as much as economists had predicted. However, unemployment nationally has hit a seven-year low after falling to 5.1 percent.

Experts say the reason for the drop in the markets on Friday was because of worries over the potential interest rate hike. The Federal Reserve is still toying with the idea and we may have an answer after the Fed's mid-September meetings.

If the Fed decides on an interest rate hike, it would be the first interest rate increase in nearly a decade.

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Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Actress Jessica Alba responded on Friday to a $5 million lawsuit filed against her company, by calling the claims in the suit "baseless and without merit."

Alba's The Honest Company is being sued by a customer who claims the brand "deceptively and misleadingly labeled and marketed its products," according to the court documents obtained by ABC News.

In the suit, filed on Thursday in Northern California District Court, Jonathan Rubin's attorneys allege that several items, including the brand's hand soap, dish soap, multi-surface cleaner and diapers, were marketed as having only natural ingredients, but in reality also have "unnatural" ingredients, some of which include "a synthetic preservative" and "a synthetic surfactant" and a petrochemical-based additive in the diapers. The suit also claims that The Honest Company's Sunscreen was ineffective.

Rubin is bringing the class-action lawsuit against The Honest Company "on behalf of a nationwide class including all other similarly situated purchasers of the Products." In addition to the claims of "unnatural" ingredients in the suit, there are exhibits and screenshots of the company's marketing, plus citations from the company's blog, which refers to the "power of chemistry" in its products.

"Honest stated on the 'honestly blog' that Cocamidopropyl Betaine 'isn't found in nature,'" according to the suit, which also claims that ingredient is found in the company's dish soap. "Based on Honest's representations that the Products were natural, Plaintiff and the Class paid a premium for the Products over comparable products that did not purport to be natural."

Alba responded Friday to the suit, saying in a statement from her rep, "We believe that consumers deserve to know what's in their products -- whether it's diapers for their children, cleaning products for their families or beauty products for themselves. Our formulations are made with integrity and strict standards of safety, and we label each ingredient that goes into every product -- not because we have to, but because it's the right thing to do."

She then addressed the allegations, calling them "baseless and without merit."

"We strongly stand behind our products and the responsibility we have to our consumers. We are steadfast in our commitment to transparency and openness," the statement added.

The lawsuit comes shortly after customers began posting pictures on social media and on Amazon, claiming to have used the Honest Sunscreen SPF 30 and gotten burned because it was not effective.

Last month, Alba, 34, and her company's co-founder, Chris Gavigan, defended the sunscreen on the company's website, explaining it had gone through extensive third-party testing and passed all requirements.

"We develop and use Honest Sunscreen to protect our own children -- Honor, Haven, Luke, Evie, and Poppy -- at the park, in the pool, outside, every day,” the founders wrote in a letter on their website, adding that they "take sun protection seriously."

On the company's page, it describes Honest as an "online destination dedicated to providing you the best in natural, healthy, and stylish living ... our goal is to help you create a safe, non-toxic, and beautiful home one small step at a time."


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Courtesy Amy Nicholls(MEDINA, Ohio) — An eBay seller who sued two customers over their negative feedback online has been ordered to pay $19,250 to cover their legal fees.

This week, a judge ordered Med Express Inc., a refurbished medical equipment seller who sued back in 2013, to pay for the two Ohio lawyers who defended the case pro bono.

Med Express filed a lawsuit for libel in Medina County's Court of Common Pleas in Ohio in 2013, claiming that their feedback on eBay hurt the company's reputation and a lower overall rating increased seller costs to eBay.

One of those customers was Amy Nicholls, an office administrator for a manufacturer in Greenville, South Carolina. She bought a microscope light for her employer in February 2013 from Med Express. After paying $175 plus $12 in shipping for the item, Med Express said in the court filing that it "took the equipment to the Valley City post office, where it was weighed and shipped to Nicholls."

Though Med Express claimed that it paid the full shipping cost, "for some reason unknown to Med Express, the equipment was received by Nicholls with $1.44 postage due," according to the court record. Med Express apologized immediately and offered to reimburse Nicholls for the postage due, but she went ahead and posted a "negative" comment about the charge on eBay's website: "Order arrived with postage due with no communication from seller beforehand," she wrote.

Med Express filed a nearly identical suit on the same day against another customer, Dennis Rogan. He left a "neutral" review.

After receiving negative publicity over their suit, Med Express apologized and said it was withdrawing the lawsuit.

"Please understand that our customer was never the target of this lawsuit. We had instructed our attorneys to ask for $1 in damages. Her feedback was also never an issue. We fully support her right and all of our customers' right to leave any feedback they desire -- true or otherwise!" Med Express President Richard Radey wrote in a statement back in 2013. "The issue involved Detailed Seller Ratings or DSRs. The low ratings caused us to lose our Top Rated Seller Plus standing."

But in April 2013, Nicholls, with the help of Jeffrey Nye and Thomas Haren, two lawyers in Ohio who offered to take the case for free, filed a counterclaim against Med Express and its attorney, claiming frivolous conduct and "malice or aggravated or egregious fraud." They cited seven different times Med Express sued out-of-state eBay customers who would have difficulty defending themselves in court. Nicholls' attorneys said they had seen Radey's comments and were aware he had dropped the lawsuit against Nicholls, but they continued with their countersuit all the same.

Med Express did not respond to a request for comment from ABC News about this week's ruling by the court, which heard the cases for Rogan and Nicholls together and issued the sanctions in favor of them jointly.

After the ruling, Nye and Haren said in a joint statement, "We were obviously happy to see that the Magistrate recognized the frivolous nature of the claims."

"Should the Magistrate’s Decision be adopted by the Court, and we certainly expect that it will, this long and frustrating battle will finally be concluded. Thankfully Amy and Dennis stood up for what they believed in, and in doing so they struck a blow in favor of the First Amendment rights of all online commenters," the attorneys said in the statement.

They said the case highlights the need for Ohio to join more than twenty other states in enacting an anti-SLAPP statute, which stands for strategic lawsuit against public participation, "so that Ohio citizens will be protected from bully tactics."

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Eric Raptosh Photography/Getty Images(SAN FRANCISCO) — The only privately-held island in San Francisco Bay is on sale with a massive price cut.

Red Rock Island hit the market in 2012 for $22 million before it was slashed to $9 million, but now it can be yours for $5 million. The 5.5-acre property is mostly rock and minerals, and its previous owners boasted of its potential gas reserves. But with a possible outcry from San Francisco residents over the prospect of drilling there, the real estate agent handling the property envisions other uses amid the skyrocketing real estate prices in the area.

In the first quarter of the 19th century, Russian hunters trapped otters on the island, SFGate.com reported. One of the previous owners, Mendel Glickman, son of Frank Lloyd Wright, thought it could be a vacation getaway, in addition to tapping gas reserves. Glickman purchased it for less than $50,000, according to SFGate.com.

When Glickman died, the property eventually went to his son, David, an attorney who now lives in Thailand, and his business associate Mack Durning.

"The Durning sons are the owners of record, and they do want to sell it," Steven Higbee, the real estate agent handling the property, told ABC News. "It's kind of in strange limbo at this point. It's been dormant for probably three years."

Higbee said the island is within the boundaries of three counties: Marin, Contra Costa and San Francisco.

David Glickman would travel to the island by helicopter, Higbee said, though there is no helipad.

"It's a big dome hump. It's solid rock with grass and trees at the top, but the grass is low and the helicopter can land without a problem," Higbee said.

"At this point, everybody goes back and forth by boat. The Boy Scouts used it for years for camping," Higbee said. "It's a short ride by boat predicated by where you're coming from. It's readily accessible from Sausalito, San Francisco or the Richmond shores."

The north side of the island faces the Richmond Bridge.

"The north side has a fairly nice beach for the Bay Area, though the other sides are pretty rocky. It's a gravely beach," Higbee said.


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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — For many people Labor Day signals the unofficial end of summer. But what exactly does the holiday commemorate?

As the name suggests, the holiday celebrates those of us in the workforce.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Statistics, there are approximately 157 million men and women in the U.S. workforce. Of those workers, the average employed American works 7.8 hours a day.

Sept. 5, 1882, marked the first Labor Day parade, which was held in New York City. However, Oregon was the first state to make Labor Day a holiday five years later in 1887.

In 1894, President Grover Cleveland made the day a national holiday.

Today, Labor Day has become one of the busiest weekends for travel before the end of summer.

For those that stay home, it's likely many will fire up their grill. The Hearth, Patio and Barbecue Association found that along with the Fourth of July and Memorial Day, Labor Day is one of the top three holidays for grilling.

The holiday is also associated with the beginning of the school year. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, some 55 million students will be boarding their buses in 2015 -- which means a whole lot of parents with a little more quiet time.


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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Labor Day gas prices are the lowest in over a decade, giving some relief to drivers who will be hitting the road this weekend for the holiday.

Average gas prices are nearly $1 lower than they were a year ago, and motorists in the south will spend the least this weekend, according to a forecast by GasBuddy. The average gas price is $2.51 cents for a gallon of regular, down nearly 13 cents from a week ago and 95 cents from a year ago, according to the U.S. Energy Department's weekly report on Monday.

Still, the price of gas varies widely across the country. Drivers in California are still paying an average of $3.34 a gallon for regular, according to the Energy Department's weekly report, while Texans are paying an average of $2.21.

Low oil prices and relatively good weather have contributed to the lowest gas prices since 2004. Drivers may save $1.4 billion at the pump this long Labor Day weekend, GasBuddy estimates. Oil producers have been creating larger supply around the world, including in the U.S. The average barrel of crude oil is around $47, about half the price from the same period a year ago.

There are as as many as 19 states where at least one retail outlet is already selling gas below $2, according to GasBuddy. South Carolina is the only state to have an average gas price under that level, at $1.995 a gallon. This weekend, nearly 70 percent of gas stations may be priced at under $2.50 a gallon compared to none last year, according to Gas Buddy's predictions.

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YinYang/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Unemployment creeps lower, but the number of jobs added seems to have missed the mark over the last month.

The U.S. unemployment rate edged down to 5.1 percent as employers added only 173,000 jobs in August, according to the latest data from the Labor Department. The number of jobs added was much lower than economists had anticipated.

[See the full report here.]

The major job gains for August occurred in health care, social assistance and in financial activities, while manufacturing and mining lost jobs.

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Schöning/ullstein bild via Getty Images(NEW YORK) — EBay is the online marketplace for 25 million sellers, but did you know that when you signed up you gave the company permission to disclose your personal information to your bidders?

GMA Investigates has found that any bidder on an item can request — and receive in a matter of seconds — a seller’s full name, city and state of residence and phone number.

So just how easy is it?

GMA placed bids of $1 each on a handful of auctions and then completed a simple request on eBay’s website in which we asked for seller contact information.

The request revealed the seller’s information.

One of the people whose information we received was an eBay seller named Anita. We are not revealing her last name.

Asked whether she knew the company could reveal her information, she replied: “No, I did not. I thought they protected your information.”

Under eBay’s “Terms and Conditions,” the company says it can share the information and that it’s meant to facilitate communication between sellers and buyers.

While eBay doesn’t release sellers' addresses, using Anita’s name, phone number and city, GMA was able to find her address online in under a minute.

“That doesn’t feel very good,” said Anita, who had listed a gold bracelet for sale. “I have children, I have a family here and I’m doing this to make extra money for my family.”

EBay notified Anita after giving out her information, at the same time also providing her with our information, but cybersecurity expert Adam Levin says scammers or thieves could use fake information in their profiles to try to get a seller’s information.

“A process like this is an enabler for bad guys even though it wasn’t designed to be,” said Levin, who is the author of the upcoming book Swiped.

EBay declined an on-camera interview with ABC News, but the company told GMA in a statement that, of “trillions of transactions,” it was unaware of any case where the information was used maliciously.

But it added that the policy would change, writing: “Due to the low usage of this functionality, as well as enhancements to other forms of communication, we’ll soon be removing that feature for bidders and sellers engaged in an active auction.”


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ponsulak/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- So-called secret mobile apps, which can be used by children to hide texts, images and videos from prying eyes, are drawing warnings and concern from officials and parents.

Louisiana resident Kristin Pinsonat, who keeps a close eye on her son’s phone, says she was shocked to find that Anthony, 16, had installed an app to hide files from his parents.

“They can do anything they want, and it's all locked with a passcode,” she said.

The issue frustrated Pinsonat, and her son admits that it wasn’t a bright move.

“Basically, I was hiding from my parents,” Anthony said. “And it was stupid, yeah.”

The apps are becoming so popular, a county district attorney in Alabama, Pamela Casey, posted a video to Facebook warning parents about the apps.

“I encourage you to look at your child’s phone,” she said. “If one child knows about it, many children know about it.”

Dan Tynan, editor in chief of Yahoo Tech Magazine, said the apps can look like ordinary functions such as a calculator, but when users enter a secret password, they have access to hidden files.

Adults can keep their children from using such apps by turning off their ability to install apps without parental approval, Tynan said.

“The problem with these apps is they allow kids to hide their cyber-lives from their parents,” Tynan said, “and sometimes the things they are hiding can harm them.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Small gains Thursday as markets continue to relax following last week's chaos.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 23.38 to finish the session at 16374.76.

The Nasdaq fell 16.48, ending at 4733.50, while the S&P 500 gained 2.27 to close at 1951.13.

Crude oil also rose, with U.S. crude oil closing at $46.75 per barrel, a gain of 50 cents.

As we wait for the August jobs report to be released on Friday, more people filed for unemployment last week. The Labor Department says not to worry though, as the overall numbers for unemployment are still hitting historically low levels.

The report may also help the Federal Reserve determine whether or not they will raise interest rates. The Fed will meet mid-September on Sept. 16 for a two-day session.

A $415 million settlement has been approved by a federal judge after a lawsuit alleged companies like Apple, Google, Intel and two other Silicon Valley companies had deliberately prevented employees from finding other work. Over 64,000 tech workers will get paid about $5,800 each.

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Bryan Mitchell/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- It's a dream come true for Tesla admirers.

Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla, revealed the electric car company will show off the look of its lower cost Model 3 in March and will begin taking pre-orders around that time.

The smaller sedan is expected to cost around $35,000 and will begin production in 2017.

"Demand would be much higher for a vehicle like that because of its price. It puts Tesla right in the meat of the market," Karl Brauer, a senior analyst at Kelley Blue Book, told ABC News in May after Musk announced the project.

Next up for Tesla though will be executing the deliveries of its sporty Model X vehicle -- the company's third car. Musk said on Twitter deliveries will begin on September 29 from Tesla's Fremont, California factory.

With the same options as a Model S, the new car will cost $5,000 more because of its size and body complexity, Musk tweeted. The base Model S starts at $70,000, not including any incentives that could be used at the federal and state level for electric vehicles.

The signature series Model X will cost in the low six-figure range for customers seeking a fully loaded, top of the line experience.

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- McDonald's Egg McMuffin and other morning items that will be available all-day starting Oct. 6 may put pressure on already high egg prices and short supplies, experts said.

Egg prices have skyrocketed in recent months due to the worst outbreak of bird flu in U.S. history, killing more than 48 million fowl in the first half of this year. Egg prices peaked this summer to a record $2.57 a dozen in June, according the U.S. Agriculture Department. According to the benchmark quotation for the U.S. egg carton market, the average price of Midwest large eggs was $2.45 on Aug. 31, compared to $1.35 for the same period a year ago.

"When you're talking about an organization as large as McDonald's in the U.S., any product they introduce will have the potential to disrupt the marketplace," said Morningstar's restaurants analyst RJ Hottovy.

At most of McDonald's restaurants, breakfast food items are no longer available after about 10:30 a.m. or 11 a.m. On Tuesday, the world's biggest fast-food chain announced that it will offer its breakfast menu throughout the day at its more than 14,300 restaurants across the nation. The company hopes the move will boost sagging sales as many customers have long asked for items like hotcakes and egg sandwiches to be available throughout the day. Breakfast products comprise about 30 percent of McDonald's overall sales in the U.S., according to the company.

Selling Egg McMuffin sandwiches all day could increase McDonald’s sales by as much as 2.5 percent a year, Bloomberg reported.

When serving items like eggs and coffee, breakfast is a higher margin product, said Hottovy, noting that McDonald's breakfast announcement is a positive move for the company.

"I don’t think they’ll get enough to move the needle, but if it catches on it will be a nice catalyst for profitability," he said.

Lisa McComb, a spokeswoman for McDonald's, said the company's operators and operator leadership voted for nationwide all-day breakfast.

"While restaurants serve All Day Breakfast, our rest-of-day core menu items will stay intact, such as the Big Mac, Quarter Pounder with Cheese, McNuggets, Fries, etc. but regions can determine what, if any, menu items need removing based on local customer preferences," McComb said in a statement.

More than 80 percent of McDonald's global restaurants are owned by franchisees.

McDonald's did not respond to ABC News about its egg supplies.


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Google(NEW YORK) -- Google has a new trick that caters to curious minds.

Simply type "I'm feeling curious" into the search engine and it will serve up a random fact worth stowing away for future trivia competitions or to whip out at the right time to impress friends.

Each fact is pulled from a website, with Google offering a link to the source.

The boredom busting tool is pretty addictive. After reading the first fact, users can click "ask another question" to get served another tidbit of information spanning every imaginable topic from space to Santa Claus.

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images(HILLSBOROUGH, Calif.) — Do you want to live like a prehistoric cartoon character? Well, now you can have your own little slice of Bedrock.  The "Flintstone House," as tourists call it, is located on a hillside overlooking Interstate 280 in Hillsborough, California, and it's up for sale, according to SFGate.

The house, which appears as if it were made of giant marshmallows is a popular Bay Area landmark.  The three-bedroom, two-bath dwelling boasts 2,730-square-feet of living space is rumored to be on the market for $4.2 million.  It last sold in September 1996 for $800,000, according to Zillow.

The house was designed by architect William Nicholson and built in 1976 to experiment with new building materials and techniques.  The current owner has lived in the house for 19 years, and reportedly is only the third owner of the house.

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iStock/Thinkstock(LOUISVILLE, Ky.) — Just how far would you be willing to go to save on the cost of groceries? Is body ink too far?

A Kentucky-based grocery store chain has announced that it will give a 20 percent lifetime discount to any of its customers who tattoo the store's logo on their bodies.

Rainbow Blossom Natural Food Markets, which is based in Louisville, said on its Facebook page that the discounts will go to customers who get the store's rainbow flower logo tattoo.

However, there are a few rules to this offer. The store's Facebook post explains that the "tattoo must be visible and not in a 'private' area and at least one inch square in size."

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