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Vacations Aren't the Same Without Your Phone


iStockThinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Used to be that people were advised never to leave home without traveler’s checks when they went on vacation.

Hardly anyone carries traveler’s checks anymore but they do carry cellphones and TripAdvisor says 90 percent of vacationers will use their mobile devices, no ifs, ands or buts about it.

As for what they’re doing on their phones, the TripAdvisor survey finds that nearly three in four need it for navigation purposes, 62 percent consult their phones for restaurants and over half will find things to do while vacationing.

Of course, in this age of having to be connected to the home base, 62 percent of people on vacation check their emails with half that number claiming to see what’s happening at work.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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One in Seven People Say They're Asleep on the Job


Creatas/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Working hard or hardly working? One way or the other, some people are able to catch a few winks while on the job, according to a survey by Virgin Pulse Institute, which bills itself as an evidence-based organization that puts research to work to help employees and companies thrive.

In a poll of nearly 1,140 workers from three U.S. companies, 15 percent admit that they napped at work at least one day a week.

That’s likely because three out of four respondents complained about feeling tired during most of the work week.

With 30 percent complaining about their sleep quality, the Virgin Pulse Institute asked why people feel so tired all the time.

The wrong room or bed temperature was the number one complaint, followed by their partners’ sleeping issues, unwanted noise or light, problems with mattresses and kids causing disruptions.

Interestingly, only 10 percent blamed health issues for their lack of sleep.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Don't Forget to Bring Your Gadget to Your Next Interview


iStock/Thinkstock(NASHVILLE, Tenn.) -- You certainly can’t hurt your chances when looking for work if you’re tech savvy.

Even better, employers believe that the strongest candidates are the ones most up to date on technological advances,

In fact, Steve Hoeffler of Vanderbilt and Stacy Wood of North Carolina State University go as far to say in a new study that, “Those who are tech savvy are also perceived as authoritative on other subjects and as leaders.”

Hoeffler and Wood contend that workplace candidates enhance their chances of employment or improve their current status on the job by merely owning a smartphone, tablet or tech-wear such as Google Glass.

What's more, the researchers believe people are viewed as a better boss or leader if they appear authoritative about a device rather than actually being able to operate it.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Diet-Shake Company Says It Disciplined Nearly 600 Distributors Making Medical Claims


Frederic J. Brown//AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Nearly 600 independent distributors of the diet and nutrition sales brand Herbalife were disciplined last year for making medical claims when selling the company’s weight-loss shakes and supplements, despite company policies aimed at preventing such tactics.

Herbalife revealed the internal figures after an ABC News undercover investigation found numerous examples of distributors boasting to potential customers that the company’s products helped treat maladies ranging from diabetes to heart disease.

A Staten Island, N.Y., Herbalife distributor even told a potential customer -- who was actually an ABC News reporter wearing a hidden camera -- that a woman with a brain tumor became symptom-free after starting on Herbalife products.

“She used to shake like this because she lost control of her motor skills to the tumor and she said part of her cerebellum was deteriorated,” he said. “If you see her now, she’s like one of us here....Whatever it is that the product did, it helped her a lot.”

Herbalife executives told ABC News that the company had taken pains to prohibit such tactics.

“I am appalled to hear you say this,” said Herbalife President Des Walsh, when confronted with ABC News findings in an interview. “What is happening there is a complete and absolute violation of our rules.”

In training materials, Herbalife instructs its members to avoid such claims. “Nutrition club members may share their experiences from using the products, but the products are not intended to diagnose, treat, prevent or cure any disease or medical condition, and under no circumstances should there be any statements, advertising or implications to the contrary,” one such warning says.

Walsh said that based on the feedback the company gets from “secret shoppers” who conduct compliance inspections for Herbalife, the instances of improper medical claims are rare.

But ABC News reporters encountered them multiple times after going undercover into nutrition clubs and training centers run by local distributors in the New York area.

The company encourages members to use personal testimonials to sell their products and recruit new distributors. At one session in Queens, N.Y., a parade of members rose to talk about their personal experiences with the products. One distributor said before she started with Herbalife she was suffering from early congestive heart failure.

“Nothing worked, I tried everything before Herbalife,” she said. “I had to stop three or four times on a flight of stairs. I got on these products, and in about three days that dry cough that a heart patient has started to go away. And you can see, I have incredible energy, and I love these products.”

Another said, “Thanks to the product, I don’t have any problems at all – I don’t get sick at all during the year with a flu or cold or nothing.”

A distributor elicited cheers when she announced that Herbalife had helped her become pregnant.

ABC News first began its investigation to learn more about the operations of the multi-level-marketing business, which is now facing investigations from the FBI, the Federal Trade Commission, and the Illinois Attorney General. At the same time, the company has been buffeted by heavy criticism from a New York hedge fund, Pershing Square, which has wagered $1 billion on the prospect that Herbalife would be shut down by the government, resulting in the collapse of its publicly traded stock.

Herbalife has defended itself, saying the company’s business model is a legitimate and proven success with 30 years of history behind it. The company has seen enormous growth in recent years, emerging from a history checkered by controversy.

Walsh noted the company has hired scientists -- even a Nobel laureate -- to help it develop products that support a healthy lifestyle. Richard Carmona, the former United States surgeon general, joined the Herbalife board of directors in October 2013, and says he carefully reviewed the company’s literature and procedures before signing on. He said he would be deeply concerned if Herbalife distributors were selling the company’s products as medical cures.

“It's serious,” he said. “You give people false hope. They may not go to their doctors. They may not take their medicines. That would be absolutely abysmal.”

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Facebook CFO David Ebersman To Step Down


Dan Kitwood/Getty Images(MENLO PARK, Calif.) -- Facebook's chief financial officer David Ebersman will step down later this year after serving in the position for nearly five years, the social networking company announced Wednesday.

Ebersman will be succeeded by David Wehner on June 1 and remain with the company through September for the transition. Wehner currently serves as Facebook's vice president of corporate finance and business planning.

"David has been a great partner in building Facebook, and I'm grateful for everything he's done to help make the world more open and connected," founder Mark Zuckerberg said in a statement. "David set us up to operate efficiently and make the long-term investments we need, and built an incredibly strong team including Dave Wehner, our next CFO. I look forward to working with Dave in his new role."

Ebersman plans to move back to a career in health care.

In another big announcement Wednesday, Facebook reported its first-quarter numbers, with revenue at $2.5 billion. The total is an increase of 72 percent from the first quarter of 2013.  The number of monthly active users as of March 31 came in at 1.28 billion, an increase of 15 percent year-over-year.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Wall Street Stocks Slide Lower After Six-Day Streak


iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --After a six-day rise, Wall Street markets took a dive following investors' reactions to the latest earning news and a less-than-stellar report on home sales.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 13 points at 16,501.65. The Nasdaq Composite lost nearly 35 points at 4,126.97, and the S&P 500 fell 4 points at 1,875.39.

A report from the Commerce Department on Wednesday shows a decrease in the number of Americans purchasing new homes. Sales of newly-built homes dropped more than 14 percent in March.  Representatives attributed colder weather to the dip in numbers.

Adding to dropping stocks, surgical robot maker Intuitive Surgical plunged 11 percent after a drop in its first-quarter earnings. Among those advancing were airlines, with Delta up 4 percent.

Facebook reported its first-quarter earnings, announcing a revenue of $2.5 billion and earnings per share of 34 cents. Apple declared a net profit of $10.2 billion, with quarterly sales of $45.6 billion and a 7 for 1 stock split.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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New Home Sales Down 14.5% in March


iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- For the second month in a row, the number of Americans purchasing new homes has taken a plunge.

The Commerce Department reported on Wednesday that sales of newly-built homes dropped more than 14 percent in March to the lowest rate since July of last year.

"[It's a] bit of a surprise that it dropped so severely after we've gotten past most of the weather effects," says David Crowe, chief economist for the National Association of Home Builders.

Compared to a year ago, new home sales are down sharply -- 13.3 percent.

Crowe says changed requirements for mortgages may be behind the drop.

"We've had tightened mortgage standards. We've had new requirements put in place as a result of legislation that was passed a couple of years ago, and the result has been blocking out a fair number of potential home-buyers. I think that's the primary reason behind the dramatic fall," he explains.

He says he expects a decent return for the rest of 2014, "but it does depend heavily upon Congress coming up with solutions to how the federal government backs mortgages."

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Satisfaction with Airlines Is Very Low, Survey Finds


iStock 360/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Don't expect too much when you fly.

According to a new survey of consumers, airlines have the lowest customer satisfaction ratings of any travel-related industry.

“It doesn’t surprise me, especially with so many mergers: the labor forces of so many airlines have been faced with compensation cuts, changes in corporate culture,” says travel blogger Brian Kelly of thepointsguy.com.

“Airlines’ employees are not happy, and that trickles down to the consumer,” he adds.

This summer during peak travel times, Kelly says, it pays for passengers to know their rights in case they are bumped from an overbooked flight. But don’t go to the airport with attitude.

“You’ve got to set your expectations, enter that airport with your goal, which is to get to your destination and take things as they come,” he says.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Why Apple Can't Quit Steve Jobs


Apple, Inc.(NEW YORK) -- Despite Steve Jobs' advice to never think about what he would do, the ghost of the visionary founder still rules at Apple two and a half years after his death, according to industry watchers.

The late CEO's voice is heard at the beginning and end of a video showing off Apple's eco-friendly and futuristic-looking office space that gained renewed attention online this week -- just another reminder of the inextricable link between Jobs and the brand he built.

"Despite having been gone for two and half years already, we are still waiting to see what Apple will be like without him," Eric Slivka, editor-in-chief at MacRumors, told ABC News. "[Jobs'] legacy has carried on within the company and its executives are undoubtedly following in his footsteps in many regards, but Apple is [also] undoubtedly evolving under Tim Cook."

As Jobs' hand-picked successor, Cook has steered the company through two and a half years of increased competition from competitors, including tech giant Samsung, but hasn't introduced the next "breakthrough" product.

Apple is scheduled to release its second quarter earnings after the closing bell Wednesday, and many analysts, including Brian Colello at Morningstar, are predicting flat results as Apple fans wait for the next big thing. Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment Wednesday morning.

The forecast “doesn’t point to much growth,” Colello said, another sign that Apple is moving sideways.

Slivka added: "It won’t be until we do or do not see another breakthrough product segment from Apple that we’ll have a better idea of what the future holds for Apple without Jobs."

"It’s been four years since the iPad was introduced, which to some feels like an eternity but in reality isn't particularly long when you look back to the iPhone in 2007 and the iPod in 2001."

Patrick Moorhead, principal technology analyst at Moor Insights and Strategy, told ABC News that Jobs' presence will continue to be a part of the company for the foreseeable future, but that Cook also deserves credit for his stewardship.

"I don’t think Tim Cook is trying to come off as Steve Jobs. I think he’s trying to take it to the next level, a company that can be great for the next 25 years. I think we will have to see. Apple will have to bring out a category killer product or they risk losing that luster," he said.

On Tuesday, Apple unveiled a new advertising campaign touting its green initiatives and included an introductory video narrated by Cook. While "think different" may have been ingrained in the Jobs era, Cook tried out a new line: "Better."

"Better. It's a powerful word, and a powerful ideal," Cook says in the introduction. "It makes us look at the world and want more than anything to change it for the better. To innovate, improve, to reinvent. To make it better."

Yukari Iwatani Kane, who wrote about Apple after Steve Jobs in the book Haunted Empire, told ABC News the video is even more proof that Apple has changed since Jobs died, even though she said the company might not want people to think so.

"What you’re seeing there is Apple trying to create a vision without Steve Jobs and personally to me, I wasn’t very convinced by it," she said.

"Steve was Apple and Apple is Steve. It was all about him. ...Now that he’s no longer there, Apple has to forge an identity of its own. Apple stardom was there in part because of Steve’s stardom. Who is the star now?" Kane asked.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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New Green Sriracha Heats Up Competition for Rooster Brand


Musahi/Huy Fong(NEW YORK) -- Could a new green sriracha unseat the famous red rooster sauce as a favorite condiment of spice lovers everywhere?

Midori Green Sriracha, sold by N.Y.-based Musahi foods, calls its sauce a "unique Japanese interpretation of the classic sauce."

Company president Gideon Sarraf told ABC News his creation is made from green chilies, which he called "a little hotter and more flavorful than jalapenos," and rice vinegar, among other "natural ingredients."

Sarraf said his sriracha is also thicker than the famous Huy Fong Foods red sauce.

Sarraf took shipment of the first green sriracha about 30 days ago, he said. It was something he had been making for himself for a while, and he just had a feeling if he could get the word out on the product the "marketing would do itself." His company is just six months old.

Right he was. Since the first news story on his product appeared on Monday, the response has been tremendous. After getting off to a slow start in the first few weeks, the company is now taking an order every two to three minutes, he said. On Amazon, sales are up 162,000 percent in just a few days, a number, he said, that "doesn't even make any sense."

Right now, the sauce is sold online at the company website and on Amazon. Sarraf said it's available in a few retail stores in New York right now, but that he is in talks with "a ton" of distributors and retailers. He said the goal is to get his product mainstreamed into supermarkets as soon as possible, and said he had no interest in limiting it to gourmet or specialty shops.

Timing may be everything, even when it comes to condiments. Sriracha has made headline after headline in recent months, from December's speculation about a worldwide sriracha shortage to recent news that one California city has declared a sriracha factory a public nuisance.

A representative for Huy Fong Foods could not be immediately reached on Wednesday by ABC News for comment.

But does Sarraf expect to hear from the makers of the red sriracha? "I haven't yet, and I very much doubt I will," he said.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Why Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto Wants to Hug Bitcoin Community


aantonop/Youtube.com(NEW YORK) -- Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto, the man who has denied allegations that he is the founder of Bitcoin, said in a new video that he wants to give the crypto-currency community a big hug to thank its members for their support.

It’s one expensive embrace. More than 49 bitcoins, amounting to nearly $24,000, have been donated to help Nakamoto clear his name since he was identified as the Bitcoin founder -- reportedly someone called Satoshi Nakamoto -- in a Newsweek article last month.

“I want to hug you, this 2,000 of you, who donated. I’m very happy, each one gives me a tick in my heart,” Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto said in the nearly three-minute-long video.

“My name is Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto and, of course, if I was the creator I would never use my real name,” he said. “So, from that point of view, I’m sure you guys would know that Satoshi Nakamoto is not me.”

For a guy who said he had nothing to do with bitcoin, Nakamoto now has an account, thanks to the donations, and said he plans to keep it for “many, many years.”

“Hopefully, I can also contribute as you did to me,” he said. “Thank you.”

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Disney Theme Parks Reimagining the Wait in Line


Disney(ORLANDO, Fla.) -- Amid all the instant gratification of today’s world, people still have to endure waiting in lines.

According to Dr. Richard Larson, a renowned expert in the physics and psychology of lines at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, people hate waiting because it’s a momentary and involuntary imprisonment.

“Once you get it into your head, you see them everywhere,” Larson told ABC News’ 20/20.  ”And you experience them everywhere.”

Larson said no one does a better job of managing long lines than the Disney theme parks run by ABC News’ parent company, The Walt Disney Co.

“We want you to have so much to look at or do or entertain your kids,” Kathy Magnum, creative executive of Walt Disney Imagineering told 20/20. "Cause kids aren’t the best line waiters, right? They’re a little impatient…If your kid’s having fun, you’re a lot more patient.”

Disney’s theme park line management is an extension of their entertainment philosophy. At Disney World’s Dumbo the Flying Elephant ride, children and their parents can play in an interactive room that resembles a circus tent.

While they’re playing, they’re also waiting for a buzzer to go off that signals it’s their turn to go onto the outdoor line for the ride.

“These kids in this tent, playing, they don’t have the perception that they’re waiting in line, but that’s what they’re doing,” said Magnum. “And their parents are having a ball because they’re escaping the heat for a while, their kids are having a good time, and they’re enjoying that.”

Other techniques Disney’s theme parks use to manage lines include interactive technology along the way, with games and touch screens, and providing comfort in the form of fans and shade to help visitors cool off. And there’s FastPass too, where you can skip the line by reserving in advance, even on mobile phones.

“People come here to have fun, first and foremost, and we want them to have a great experience,” Magnum said.  “And if you’ve got the perception of spending less time waiting, ’cause you’re having so much fun, we feel like we’ve done our job.”

Watch ABC News’ 20/20 on Friday, April 25 at 10 p.m. ET.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Drones, Phones and Mind Maps Make MIT List of Technology Breakthroughs


iStock/360/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Cool ideas to power the future: Drones for farmers, brain mapping for neuroscientists and super-private smartphones are among the 10 breakthrough technologies highlighted in the new annual list by MIT Technology Review.

The magazine’s rundown is a reminder that innovations will continue to change the way we live and, in many cases, offer improvements.

A new mind map, a decade in the works, “shows structures of the brain in far greater detail than ever before,” and gives neuroscientists new ways to look at the brain’s incredible complexity.

The magazine also reports on new efforts to build smartphones for the Snowden area. New models are being introduced with extra security and privacy that would make it far more difficult for eavesdroppers to monitor phone calls.

With growing populations, demand for food continues to rise. “Relatively cheap drones with advanced sensors and imaging capabilities are giving farmers new ways to increase yields and reduce crop damage,” says the Review.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Employment Outlook Brighter for College Grads


Digital Vision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- It’s good to be a college graduate. Or, at the very least, it’s better than it was last year.

An update of the National Association of Colleges and Employers' job outlook finds that employers will hire 8.6 percent more graduates this spring, compared to the same time in 2013.

Employers that responded to the NACE survey indicated that they’re mostly looking for business, engineering and accounting majors with bachelor’s degrees. In fact, seven in ten companies specifically want business majors.

Grads who will likely struggle to find work will be those who got their degrees in health science and education although Andrea Koncz, employment information officer for NACE, points out that the preponderance of respondents were from the finance, insurance and real estate industries.

As for who can expect to earn the most with their bachelor’s degree, it's petroleum engineering majors with a starting salary of $95,300.

While companies expect to employ more grads in 2014, Koncz says the numbers are still on the flat side because the rate of increase is really no different from previous years.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Online 'Dating' Site for Dogs or Cats


iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- It’s like online dating -- except for people seeking dogs or cats or chinchillas or whatever else may be the perfect pet for them.

“It’s exactly like using Match.com,” says Darrell Lerner, who ought to know. Before he founded pet-finder site Allpaws (which currently has 82,960 pets awaiting adoption), Lerner co-founded SNAP Interactive, the developer of AYI (Are You Interested?), a dating application on Facebook with, he says, some 70 million installs.

Allpaws, says its website, “Takes online pet listing in a new and exciting direction by offering an online dating style interface complete with advanced search tools.” Those include some 30 different search filters, Lerner tells ABC News.

Adopters (we hesitate to call them “early adopters,” although the site launched only this past January) can search by type of pet, breed, location, gender, age, size or friskiness. You can search for a bird who’s great with children, a senior cat or a special-needs chinchilla.

The site lists over 49,000 dogs, over 31,000 cats, 1,208 rabbits and 272 horses -- not to mention 658 animals “small and furry,” 79 that hail from the barnyard and 238 slitherers and other assorted reptiles.

Meanwhile, PuppyFind.com, as its name implies, matches puppy-seekers with breeders. “We’re puppies-only,” says Mike Peters, head of business development.

Peters tells ABC News the site lists some 50,000 puppies (from 300 different breeds), some priced as high at $3,000 per pup. The site makes money by charging breeders a flat fee. It exists only to connect buyers and sellers. From there, it takes no further role in the transaction.

The site, says Peters, was the target of scammers some years ago -- people falsely claiming to be breeders, many doing business from overseas. They would list puppies for sale and collect the money. Then Fido would not be forthcoming. Such scammers, in their sales blurbs, would tell heart-tugging tales explaining why they had to sell their Dalmatians at fire-sale prices, he says. The cons were cousins to those now in circulation, for example, where a man trapped in the Cairo airport promises to send you a check for $1,000, if only you will wire $350 so he can get a new passport.

PuppyFind, Peters says, has since installed security software that makes such scams harder to perpetrate.

Miranda Furtado, 28, of Toronto, Canada, tells ABC she used PuppyFind last November. The self-described editor, guru and broadcaster -- founder of a website that delivers sports news to women (BabesDigBalls) -- says she had always wanted a French bulldog. She calls finding the right dog online a higher-risk proposition than online dating.

“With a puppy, you’re putting money down,” she explains. “I wasn’t even sure the dog would show up.”

But he did. And Elvis (so-named because he has a cleft lip) has since turned out to be “an amazing dog.”

His lip was not a defect in Furtado’s eyes, since it made him a cheaper buy than a Canadian bulldog would have been. “Here, they’re really expensive,” she explained.

Elvis is the best dog she has ever had, says Furtado. “I couldn’t be happier,” she says.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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